Steamed Kimchi Dumplings (Jjin Kimchi Mandu)

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Steamed Kimchi Dumplings (Jjin Kimchi Mandu)

It’s been just over 2 months since I made my failed Kimchi mandu (김치만두). Do you remember that post? I learnt a lot of lessons that day. I read my chronicle on How to make “successful” mandu two times thoroughly just before I gave it a second try. My second time trying it turned out really well. I shared the work with my two sisters, so it made it a lot easier but I still spent half of my day on making these.

The main point of making good mandu is

  • Squeezing dry the ingredients completely if it is possible.
  • Spreading enough flour on the board where you roll the dough each time and the dish where you put the mandu, so it is easy to separate.

Steamed Kimchi Dumplings (Jjin Kimchi Mandu)

Unfortunately, I got a lot less mandu than last time. I used a similar amount of ingredients but I got half less mandu. I think hand made mandu needs more stuffing than the ones made with a mandu shaper. (You need to fill the stuffing generously to make cute looking mandu for hand made ones, but if you add too much stuffing for mandu shaper ones, it won’t close properly).

Ingredients for 25 dumplings

-Dumpling skinsSteamed Kimchi Dumplings (Jjin Kimchi Mandu in Korean)st1

  • All purpose white flour – 3 cups
  • Warm water – 1 cup

-Dumpling stuffing

  • Kimchi- 1⅔ cups
  • 1/2 an onion
  • Mung bean sprouts – 200 g
  • Tofu – 275 g
  • Minced pork – 130 g
  • 1 egg
  • Minced garlic – 1/2 tsp
  • Salt – 1 tsp
  • Sesame oil – 1 tsp
  • Ground black pepper – 3 sprinkles

Preparation (You can click the picture to see the bigger image)Steamed Kimchi Dumplings (Jjin Kimchi Mandu in Korean)st2

  1. Sieve the flour, add the water, then knead it (my sister kneaded it for nearly 30 minutes).
  2. Finely chop the Kimchi, onion, tofu, and pork.
  3. Par boil the green bean sprouts and chop them finely too.
  4. Squeeze the bean sprouts, tofu, onion, meat, and Kimchi, separately in a straining cloth.
  5. Mix all the squeezed ingredients in a big bowl and season it with the garlic, salt, sesame oil, and pepper.
  6. Add the eggs and mix them well.

My sister worked so hard being a hand model for this recipe, especially squeezing all those ingredients. It is quite hard work if you want to do it properly. Thanks again Hyunji!

StepsSteamed Kimchi Dumplings (Jjin Kimchi Mandu in Korean)st3

  1. Spread some flour onto the board and plate.
  2. Slice a dough piece off.
  3. Roll the dough into round shapes, not too thin not too thick.
  4. Put the rolled pastry on one hand and add filling on top (you need to fill it with an adequate amount of the stuffing to make a good looking mandu).
  5. Seal the pastry then place it on a plate (You can seal it into whatever shape you want, I fold it in half then wrap the ends round to touch each other)
  6. Repeat steps 1 to 5 until you use up all the ingredients.
  7. Put some kind of cloth on a steamer and put the mandu on top.
  8. Steam it for 5-10 minutes.
  9. Serve it on a plate with dipping sauce (a mix of; soy sauce – 1 tbsp, sugar – 1/2 tsp, chili powder 1/4 tsp, a dash of vinegar and a dash of sesame oil).

I also made some mandu soup (만두국) with the rest of the mandu (the ones that I didn’t steam), but steamed mandu tasted better.

Steamed Kimchi Dumplings (Jjin Kimchi Mandu in Korean)2

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Steamed Kimchi Dumplings (Jjin Kimchi Mandu)
 
Author:
Recipe type: Appetiser
Cuisine: Korean
Serves: 25 dumplings
Ingredients
-Dumpling skins
  • All purpose white flour – 3 cups
  • Warm water – 1 cup
-Dumpling stuffing
  • Kimchi- 1⅔ cups
  • ½ an onion
  • Mung bean sprouts – 200 g
  • Tofu – 275 g
  • Minced pork – 130 g
  • 1 egg
  • Minced garlic – ½ tsp
  • Salt – 1 tsp
  • Sesame oil – 1 tsp
  • Ground black pepper – 3 sprinkles
Instructions
Preparation
  1. Sieve the flour, add the water, then knead it (my sister kneaded it for nearly 30 minutes).
  2. Finely chop the Kimchi, onion, tofu, and pork.
  3. Par boil the green bean sprouts and chop them finely too.
  4. Squeeze the bean sprouts, tofu, onion, meat, and Kimchi, separately in a straining cloth.
  5. Mix all the squeezed ingredients in a big bowl and season it with the garlic, salt, sesame oil, and pepper.
  6. Add the eggs and mix them well.
Steps
  1. Spread some flour onto the board and plate.
  2. Slice a dough piece off.
  3. Roll the dough into round shapes, not too thin not too thick.
  4. Put the rolled pastry on one hand and add filling on top (you need to fill it with an adequate amount of the stuffing to make a good looking mandu).
  5. Seal the pastry then place it on a plate (You can seal it into whatever shape you want, I fold it in half then wrap the ends round to touch each other)
  6. Repeat steps 1 to 5 until you use up all the ingredients.
  7. Put some kind of cloth on a steamer and put the mandu on top.
  8. Steam it for 5-10 minutes.
  9. Serve it on a plate with dipping sauce (a mix of; soy sauce – 1 tbsp, sugar – ½ tsp, chili powder ¼ tsp, a dash of vinegar and a dash of sesame oil).

 

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About Sue

Hi, I'm Sue and I am the author/cook/photographer behind My Korean Kitchen. Thank you for joining me in this delicious culinary journey!

Comments

  1. Lisa Leong says:

    I just made this evening.Very delicious and easy to prepare. The downside of this recipe is I don’t have enought kimchi in my kitchen. Anyway it is extra ordinary dumpling, I will redo it whenever time is available.


    Spatula
    is very useful in flipping dumpling.

  2. Hi Sue,

    I just wanted to give BIG thanks for this recipe. I made Mandu with my Swiss boyfriend’s parents on New Year’s Day and they absolutely loved it. Please keep up with sharing your lovely kitchen stories.

    All the best,
    YJ

  3. Hi Sue,

    i made Steamed Kimchi Dumpling today but it not turned good because of the skin is too hard. i am not sure if i use wrong flour but i did choose All Purpose flour. can you please let me know how to make the skin soft so that the dumpling would be yummy.

    I am waiting for your reply.

    Cheers!

    • That’s strange. I don’t know why would the skin be hard? Mine was just right though. Anyway, I am making another mandu this week and will let you know.

  4. You know… this seems great. I saw this just now. We’re having a food sale (school requirement) and I had this idea of Kimchi dumplings… In my mind, I thought there was no pork in it. I guess, in dumplings, pork cannot be secluded from the equation.
    This looks great!! I’ll try it out!… as soon as I go to the nearest Korean Store and buy some great Kimchi. Best of luck, Sue.

  5. proudmama says:

    Have you ever try making steamed mandu, the kind with thick skin and inside is either sweet red bean or meat/noodle mixture? I remember having this in Korea as a kid and would like to try making one myself. Any advice for making the bread portion of this mandu? thanks

    • That’s called Jjinbbang I think. That’s more of a bread kind rather than mandu. I don’t know how to cook it yet, but will add to my list.

  6. Jeanie Lee says:

    Hi Sue,

    The filling is nutritious, i love it!

    Warm regards,
    Jeanie

  7. Hi poe chee,

    Don’t worry about the Kimchi.
    I will make it one by one in the near future.
    Cheers.

  8. First of all, I’d like to say “thank you deeply!.
    I really appreciate your foods and stuffs.
    ‘Cause…..I am sure that with your kindness and lovely ways of making your own styles….
    Anyhow, thanks again for helping me to be able to cook myself well..
    And, if it isn’t make you busy, please tell me how to make your korean KIMCHI, all kinds of kimchi one by one..
    So..may you be an excellent creator!
    Best wishes
    poe chee

  9. Thank you Evil Jonny,
    You are so kind to say that. :)

  10. You are a goddess for posting such wonderful step-by-step instructions — thank you!

  11. Kat, Thank you. Definitely better looking than the first ones. :)

    Emily, You must be a big fan of mandu.

    Jason, that is a good idea. I haven’t heard of using cabbage for anti sticking purpose before. I should try from next time. Thanks.

  12. One thing I tend to do when making steamed mandu/jiaozi/mushi-gyouza is to line the bamboo steamer with cabbage leaves, either whole or shredded. Then the mandu don’t stick to the steamer when eating them at the table. Sometimes they stick to the cabbage, but that’s far easier to deal with than a mandu that spills its filling all over my steamer basket when I try to take it out….

    • Any edible leafy green, or a moistened piece of cloth, or even a coffee filter, will also prevent sticking. Heavy-duty coffee filters such as Chemex brand can be washed, dried and reused later. Reduce, reuse and recycle just as in the olden days when avoiding wasted food — using lots of scraps, just as for omelet fillings — was part of what dumplings were all about.

  13. i can eat mandu all day long. I will try your receipe.

  14. These look great!

  15. kawaiinani san says:

    wow! very delicious ^_^ yummy x3!

Trackbacks

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