Healthy Korean Multi-Grain Shakes – Homemade Misutgaru Latte

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Healthy Korean Multi-Grain Shakes (Misutgaru Latte)

When I was in high school grade 12, my life was pretty hectic. I get up at 6am in the morning, left home for school around 6:50 to 7 am, arrive at school around 7:30 am and stayed there until 11pm, studying. Can you believe that? I know I wasn’t the only one who had to stay at school for those crazy hours, but still you really need a good balance of food to keep you going or “survive” I would say.

I always tried to get a proper breakfast – rice, soup and side dishes – a typical Korean every day food, but if I got up late and I didn’t have enough time to have my breakfast, my mum always handed out this multi-grain shake (Misutgaru Latte or Misugaru Latte if you already tried it from Caffe Bene) to me at the door.

Healthy Korean Multi-Grain Shakes (Misutgaru Latte)

Misutgaru (미숫가루) is a mixed multi-grain powder that is ground, roasted and/or steamed. It is high in protein with relatively low calories, so it is popular among people on a weight loss diet. It certainly kept me going longer than a rushed regular breakfast I had while I was at school.

This is what Misutgaru looks like.

Misutgaru in a spoon

The package I bought was produced by the local rice cake mill store (떡집/방앗간). I personally think this is the best kind you could get, as it omits artificial additives. This yellow sandy colour bag of Misutgaru was AUD $7 and I purchased it from a Korean grocery store in the Brisbane CBD.

It is also quite common to take your own choice of grains to the rice cake mill store and ask them to make a powder for Misutgaru. This way you can choose your own grains for whatever % components you would like.

Misutgaru (Powder)

(Multi-grain mixture: Medium grain white rice, Brown rice, Black rice, Barley, Adlay, Black beans, Soy beans)

After opening the packet, I keep Misutgaru in an air tight glass jar. Some Misutgaru comes in a resealable packet. Regardless, Misutgaru can be kept in the freezer for more than a year without getting spoiled.

There are many ways you can make Misutgaru shakes. You can

  • Add some sugar or honey
  • Add some water or milk.
  • Make it runny by increasing water or milk or make it thicker but powdery by adding more Misutgaru
  • Add ice cubes if making it for summer hot weather
  • Use a shaker or a blender or a tea spoon and stir it really hard

For my recipe below, I wanted to recreate the Misutgaru Latte I used to drink when I was at high school. I hope you find it delicious and filling! Enjoy.

Ingredients for 5 servings (takes less than 3 mins to make)

 Misutgaru Latte Ingredient

  • 5 Tbsp Misutgaru
  • 3 and 1/2 cup milk
  • 4 ice cubes
  • 3 Tbsp honey

Direction

Add above ingredients into the blender and mix well.

Misutgaru Latte in Vitamax

Before blending

Misutgaru Blended

Blending

Misutgaru Latte 1

Ready to drink!


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Healthy Korean Multi-Grain Shakes - Homemade Misutgaru Latte
 
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Drinks
Cuisine: Korean
Serves: 5
Ingredients
  • 5 Tbsp Misutgaru
  • 3 and ½ cup milk
  • 4 ice cubes
  • 3 Tbsp honey
Instructions
  1. Add above ingredients into the blender and mix well.

 

About Sue

Hi, I'm Sue and I am the author/cook/photographer behind My Korean Kitchen. Thank you for joining me in this delicious culinary journey!

Comments

  1. Hey!!! I was wondering if you can tell me more about the various amount of benefits of this drink, health/beauty-wise ! Thank you!!

  2. What’s the name of the Korean store in Brisbane where you purchased the multi grain powder?

  3. Hello! I recently went to Lotte Asian market and ask the guy who work there for Multi-Grain powder but instead he give me Multi-Grain Flour. Should I have ask him a different question?

    • It sounds like a different thing (though it could be the same thing. Hard to tell without looking at the product.) Can anyone works there speak Korean? Then ask for misutgaru. That should make everything clear! or You can send me the picture of the product then I will be able to tell you whether it’s the correct one.

  4. Hi there :)

    I subscribe to your feed and, when I saw this post, it got me curious. I love korean cuisine but… it’s just that… ok, here it goes:
    I’m majoring in Nutrition and when I saw this natural protein shake I got interested. The thing is raw grains are known to be toxic, specially soy beans and black beans. The beans itself are indeed a very good source of proteins, but after going through some sort of heat treatment that destroy the toxic components. Eating (or drinking) this raw sounds like poison to me and even to my teachers ><
    I'm only a student and still learning, but would please tell me how well does your did your body took this on your first try? It's the scientific side of me begging for answers xD

    Love your blog, by the way. Thanks for sharing and keep it up <3

    • Actually, never mind. Just saw that it is roasted and/or steamed. So sorry, the shock blocked those words from my eyes ><

      Now I just HAVE to try this :D

      • :) You are very funny! I am glad that you found your answer. Though, I learnt something new from you. I didn’t know that raw grain is toxic. As far as I know I’ve never ate raw grains and probably never will!

  5. Hi Sue,

    I really enjoy reading your blog and I have tried plenty of your recipes. I have a Korean husband and fell in love with Korean food instantly after he brought me to a Korean Restaurant for the first time 11 years ago when we were dating. I am really glad that I found your site and I have tried most of the recipes and they really turn out well, my Korean husband also enjoy the food a lot. I am really happy that I finally can cook Korean food for my husband. I am excited to know you are back online and looking forward to learn about Korean cooking and culture from you. Thank you so much for sharing!

    I would like to ask you for how Shike recipe – the famous korea rice drinks. I really like shike and I am wondering if it is actually easy to make at home :)

    I have became one of your blog’s fan ^^

    • Thanks Sonya, I can’t believe you tried most of my recipes! I am very glad to hear that you and your husband enjoyed the food. Yes, Shike is already on my recipes to do list. Just stay tuned. :)

  6. Thanks for the reminder of this drink. I totally forgot I had some of this powder until I read this post. Just gave it to my babies and they love it. Glad to see you back to blogging.

    • Thanks Jessica, Glad your babies liked it! I think Misutgaru is so versatile that it will make a good baby formula.

      • So sorry…when I said “my babies” I meant my kids. They’re 5, 4, and 2. :) They haven’t been babies in a while…but I feel like they’re still babies.

        • I would call my kids “babies” too. Probably until they leave home for college or something. :) (Just to be clear, I don’t have any kids yet)

  7. Elizabeth says:

    Hi,
    not sure how I stumbled onto your website but now I am a follower. Love your website.

    THANK YOU for the helpful info! I love this stuff — had it growing up and it’s hard to find one from a store that’s preservative free…. I will look in to getting it from a dduk jip. from Washington D.C.

    • Thanks Elizabeth,
      I am glad that you find the post informative.
      I hope you can find Misutgaru from your local rice cake store 떡집.

  8. Ooooh…this sounds so good!!! It sounds really similar to a sort of warm dessert we enjoy (we are HK Chinese). My favorite flavor is a black sesame blend, mixed with hot water and served as a dessert soup. (“Ji Ma Wu”) I’ll have to look for this!!!

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