Korean Spicy Soft Tofu Stew (Sundubu Jjigae)

Pin It
Korean Spicy Soft Tofu Stew (Sundubu Jjigae)

Today, some people may say, “Finally!”. Yes, I finally made “Sundubu Jjigae” (순두부 찌개) last night. I think this is the top 3rd keyword search recipe people try to find from my blog. What is so special about this stew folks? I am really curious.

Ingredients for 2 people

ingredients for sundunu jjigae
  • Korean soft (uncurdled) tofu 400g
  • (Unshelled) little-neck clams 200g (Bajirak 바지락 in Korean – you can learn a little bit more about it from the second paragraph of my other post)
  • 1 pack of enoki mushrooms
  • Oyster mushrooms 1 fistful
  • 1 stalk of spring onion
  • Dried kelp 2 sheets – 10x7cm size each (Though you don’t have to copy the exact size of mine)
  • Water 1 and 1/3 cups
  • Korean chili powder – 1Tbsp
  • Cooking oil – 1Tbsp
  • Minced garlic – 1 tsp
  • Ground salt – 1 tsp +1/4 tsp
  • Soy sauce – 1/2 tsp
  • Ground black pepper 3 sprinkles
  • Sesame oil – 1 dash

Preparation

  1. Soak the clams in cold water for about 30 minutes. (Add some salt – 1tsp). This is to encourage clams to spit out any debris to the water.
  2. Soak the kelp in 1 and 1/3 cups of water for about 30 minutes.
  3. Diagonally thin slice the spring onion.
  4. Cut the bottom 4-5 cm of the mushrooms off (the roots) and wash the rest for use.
  5. Separate oyster mushrooms with hands.
  6. Drain the clams from step.1  and throw the water away
  7. Drain the kelp from step.2 and keep the water, we will use it as a broth.

Cooking

1. Put the chili powder, olive oil, and the garlic in a pot.

2. Heat the pot on the stove and stir it for 1 -2 mins.

Cooking sundubu jjigae1

3. Add the clams and stir it.
4. Add the water and tofu. Boil it for about 1 minute or until the water starts to boil.
5. Add all the mushrooms, salt, and soy sauce. Boil it for about 1 minute. (Again until the water starts to boil properly.)
6. Top up with the spring onion, pepper and sesame oil. (You can adjust the taste with salt if necessary.)

Cooking sundubu jjigae2

7. Serve.

sundubu jjigae

For your curiosity this is the tofu I used for this stew.
It is about 1000 won – US $ 1

sundubu

How to open – cut the red dotted line (next to the bar code) with scissors. Can you see the line?

Note:

I hope you use a bit bigger pot than mine because it can boil over. This happened to me last night “again”, I think that is why I don’t like making this stew much even though it’s so delicious! :) I don’t know how to measure a pot but I’ll try to give the best possible description as I can. Its bottom diameter is 11.5 cm and top diameter is about 15.5 cm. If you can’t get a bigger pot then reduce some vegetable ingredients or water.

Korean Spicy Soft Tofu Stew (Sundubu Jjigae)
 
Author:
Recipe type: Stew
Cuisine: Korean
Serves: 2
Ingredients
  • Korean soft (uncurdled) tofu 400g
  • (Unshelled) little-neck clams 200g
  • 1 pack of enoki mushrooms
  • Oyster mushrooms 1 fistful
  • 1 stalk of spring onion
  • Dried kelp 2 sheets – 10x7cm size each (Though you don’t have to copy the exact size of mine)
  • Water 1 and ⅓ cups
  • Korean chili powder – 1Tbsp
  • Cooking oil – 1Tbsp
  • Minced garlic – 1 tsp
  • Ground salt – 1 tsp +1/4 tsp
  • Soy sauce – ½ tsp
  • Ground black pepper 3 sprinkles
  • Sesame oil – 1 dash
Instructions
Preparation
  1. Soak the clams in cold water for about 30 minutes. (Add some salt – 1tsp). This is to encourage clams to spit out any debris to the water.
  2. Soak the kelp in 1 and ⅓ cups of water for about 30 minutes.
  3. Diagonally thin slice the spring onion.
  4. Cut the bottom 4-5 cm of the mushrooms off (the roots) and wash the rest for use.
  5. Separate oyster mushrooms with hands.
  6. Drain the clams from step.1 and throw the water away
  7. Drain the kelp from step.2 and keep the water, we will use it as a broth.
Cooking
  1. Put the chili powder, olive oil, and the garlic in a pot.
  2. Heat the pot on the stove and stir it for 1 -2 mins.
  3. Add the clams and stir it.
  4. Add the water and tofu. Boil it for about 1 minute or until the water starts to boil.
  5. Add all the mushrooms, salt, and soy sauce. Boil it for about 1 minute. (Again until the water starts to boil properly.)
  6. Top up with the spring onion, pepper and sesame oil. (You can adjust the taste with salt if necessary.)
  7. Serve.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

About Sue

Hi, I'm Sue and I am the author/cook/photographer behind My Korean Kitchen. Thank you for joining me in this delicious culinary journey!

Comments

  1. Hi, may I know what kind of chili powder you used to cook this? Is it the same chili powder you used to make kimchii? If I were to make my own chili powder, can I used the dried chili available in market and pound it, instead of drying the fresh chili under the sun?

  2. Michael says:

    American English teacher in Seoul. Just tried my first attempt at making 순두부. Was happy with the taste but not the tofu texture. Was nothing like I would get at 김밥천국. Search the internet, find you and learn i’m supposed to cut on the red line of the 두부 and not the pointed end and squeeze out. Look forward to looking through the rest of your recipes. 감사합니다

  3. I made this for dinner tonight, but with egg instead of mushrooms, because that’s the way I had it in a restaurant. I loved it! Thanks for the recipe.

  4. Thank you for posting this recipe. This turned out GREAT! The spiciness was just perfect – spicy but not overbearing. I did add more salt though. I also added shrimp and squid along with the mushroom and it came out perfrect! I loved the way you make the broth with dry kelp – so healthy and yummy. I’ve always thought this dish was too complicated but it is actually really simple and easy to make. Thank you so much!

  5. oh i just found this site today! i love your dishes! im a very big fan of korean food so I decided to search for recipes. yours look excactly like what i ate today =)
    know i need to know where i can get these pots ><"

    thanks for the post <3

  6. Thanks for the awesome recipe. I attended Yonsei’s Ohhakdang when I was stationed at Uijongbu and I remember getting a bowl of sundubu plus some rice for about 1100 won at the student cafe. Man, was that ever yummy!

    Now if I could ever figure out how to make that dish with the chicken and dumplings. That is one of the many, many other Korean dishes I crave. Korean food is one of the world’s top cuisines, I’m glad to see it’s catching on in other countries.

  7. I’ve got a question about the tofu …

    I bought one a while back and made soondubu with it, but I used the spout instead. It’s so soft! How did you keep it intact, especially when cutting at the dotted line?

  8. Hi Jinnie

    I am so glad to hear that!
    All recipes on this blog are tested couple of times before I post them. So they should taste good.
    If the recipe doesn’t turn out well then I wouldn’t let other people know until I improve it. :)
    Thank you.

  9. I tried making this before following other recipes but they just didn’t taste right. Then I came across your recipe and WOW.. I couldn’t believe it tasted just as good if not better than the ones they sell at the sundubu restaurants. My husband was VERY impressed. Thanks for posting!

  10. Hi Alvin,

    I don’t like when the soup boils over, because I need to clean up the gas range afterwards. Though, it is kind of an unavoidable thing. :)
    My pot is too small for the amount of ingredients I add.

  11. I peeked into the kitchen at a restaurant in San Jose where they were cooking these things up. I saw that they had the bowls on a grill with the flames shooting up. The bowls were boiling over like crazy but they had a pitcher of broth with which they were constantly refilling them. Thought you might be interested!

    Yours looks just like the kind you get from a restaurant, well done! I’ll have to try it sometime!

  12. I want to get cable to see more American shows especially food programs, but our apartment building doesn’t allow us to drill holes for the antenna on our balconies. :(

  13. Sue,
    clamsss again :D, yummm
    Anyway today I made chocolate mousse from tofu. Check that out at http://evimeinar.multiply.com/photos/album/109

  14. It is surprise to hear that Korean soap dramas are still popular. Because some TV critics are concerned that Korean fever is dying away.

    Anyway, I haven’t seen any Korea dramas for about 2-3 years now.
    It is so boring. They often use similar story line; rich guy-poor girl’s love (or the other way around), or triangle relationships, or someone’s lover is very ill etc.

    I watch American TV most of the time and some Japanese dramas to keep up with my Japanese study. I recently watched “Stand-up”, which is similar to American pie.

  15. No, I haven’t tried it, will have to when my hubby is not around, he doesn’t care for Korean food too much. I think Korean cuisine is popular here because of the popularity of “Winter Sonata”–the drama with Bae Yong Joon and Che Joo. In fact, a lot of Korean soap operas are popular here. I sometimes tune in to some, but not always, why are they always so sad?

  16. Hi, Kat
    Have you tried it yourself? It is quite nice to have in the cold season.
    I wonder why it is so popular in Japan.

    Hi, Mary
    About the jjigae bowl – I got it for free when I bought 3kg of gochujang at Homeplus. It is a type of “dduk bae gi”. If you can’t get it from E-mart then try dish shops near your home or traditional markets (like Namdaemun). They should have it. Its price starts from 2000 won :) If you can’t find it from dish shops, which is not likely to be a problem, get some help from Korean friends to order it on the internet. Here is the example link from an online shop in Korea.

    About the mandu recipe – I don’t have one yet, though I bought a tool that closes mandu easily and prettily the other day, which implies that I am going to make one soon. ;)

  17. FINALLY! I am very excited about this post. But I have a question. Where do I get the jjigae bowls? I always look at emart, but my mind goes blank and I have no clue what I’m looking for, and about how much do they cost?

    Is there a mandu recipe?

  18. ooh, this dish is really popular in Japan now. Yours looks delicious.

Trackbacks

  1. […] its commercial taste. I tried this meal last weekend, twice. At first I cooked it in a hot pot (Dduk bae gi – Traditional looking stew pot), but I really needed two pots for two people. It was a bit […]

  2. […] Friday night after work Eileen made some really delicious soup for dinner.  I have had sundubu before but it has never been one of my favorites.  When she made it though I was in total bliss.  […]

  3. […] meal, try samgyeopsal (heaven on a grill) or pop into a kalbi joint. You won’t regret it. Try sundubu jjigae (tofu soup) if you’re looking for a lighter meal, or sample some bibimbap if a spicy mix of […]

  4. […] pulled it from My Korean Kitchen, where the author keeps a large collection of authentic Korean recipes that I’ve been itching […]

  5. […] Uncurdled Tofu Stew (Sundubu Jjigae in Korean) Dubu, Korean cuisine, Korean Food, Side Dishes (Banchan), soy sauce, tofuBookmark to: […]

Speak Your Mind

*

Rate this recipe:  
Powered by sweet Captcha