Simple Steamed Eggs (Gyeran Jjim)

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Simple Steamed Eggs (Gyeran Jjim)4

I don’t like receiving phone calls around meal time, especially when I am busy preparing food. It might sound strange but I believe the more attention the food gets, the tastier it gets. Unfortunately I was on the phone while the eggs were steaming in the pot. It was my sister from Korea, you know what happens then. The long chit chat and giggles.

Nevertheless, I couldn’t concentrate much on the conversation. My mind was with the steaming eggs (Gyeran Jjim, 계란찜). Hang up, sis! I need to check my babies. I returned to the kitchen. Tada~! I opened the lid and I saw real gems in pretty cups. I didn’t expect the eggs to rise yet they looked so adorable!

Simple Steamed Eggs (Gyeran Jjim)3

I think the eggs have a joker face. You never know what it is going to be until you serve it. Do you agree? I was so happy to see the well transformed eggs but slightly sad that I missed how they transformed. I hope you don’t miss this.

Simple Steamed Eggs (Gyeran Jjim)1

Ingredients (to serve 3 people)

  • 6 large eggs (~70g each)
  • 15cm by 15cm kombu (dried seaweed)
  • 1 cup of warm water
  • 2 tbsp anchovy sauce
  • 1 stalk of finely chopped shallot (green part only)
  • 1/3 of finely chopped medium size carrot

Prep

  1. Soak the kombu in warm water for 15 minutes.
  2. Beat the eggs and sieve them two times.
  3. Add the kombu water into the beaten eggs (discard the kombu).
  4. Add the anchovy sauce, shallots, and carrot. Mix them well.
  5. Pour the egg mixture into bowls (up to 80% of the bowl) and cover them with plastic wrap.

Simple Steamed Eggs (Gyeran Jjim) steps

Cooking (It makes it easier if you have a big steamer)

  1. Boil the water in a steamer (high heat).
  2. When the water starts to boil, put the bowls inside the steamer.
  3. Lower the heat to medium to low, steam the bowls for about 15-20 minutes. Serve them when they are all cooked.

Simple Steamed Eggs (Gyeran Jjim)2

The raised eggs sink slightly as time passes. Though they still look pretty. It was a perfect match with plain rice. Michael thinks it can be a good entree as well being a perfect side dish. However eating it on its own can be salty, so you might want to reduce the amount of anchovy sauce to 1 tbsp if you don’t like too much salt taste.

For a variation, you can add other kinds of vegetables or even some meat. I will do another post with those some other time. In the mean time, I also think plain steamed egg would be a good baby’s solid food.

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Simple Steamed Eggs (Gyeran Jjim)
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Side dishes
Cuisine: Korean
Serves: 3
Ingredients
  • 6 large eggs (~70g each)
  • 15cm by 15cm kombu (dried seaweed)
  • 1 cup of warm water
  • 2 tbsp anchovy sauce
  • 1 stalk of finely chopped shallot (green part only)
  • ⅓ of finely chopped medium size carrot
Instructions
-Prep
  1. Soak the kombu in warm water for 15 minutes.
  2. Beat the eggs and sieve them two times.
  3. Add the kombu water into the beaten eggs (discard the kombu).
  4. Add the anchovy sauce, shallots, and carrot. Mix them well.
  5. Pour the egg mixture into bowls (up to 80% of the bowl) and cover them with plastic wrap.
-Cooking (It makes it easier if you have a big steamer)
  1. Cooking
  2. Boil the water in a steamer (high heat).
  3. When the water starts to boil, put the bowls inside the steamer.
  4. Lower the heat to medium to low, steam the bowls for about 15-20 minutes. Serve them when they are all cooked.

 

About Sue

Hi, I'm Sue and I am the author/cook/photographer behind My Korean Kitchen. Thank you for joining me in this delicious culinary journey!

Comments

  1. hi Sue
    I love your steam egg recipe! I’ve tried on my own but could never get the egg/water ratio right.
    My daughter has a fish allergy though, can you suggest any alternatives to anchovy sauce?
    even just Salt or salted baby shrimp (sae ooh jut?) just don’t know how much would be good.
    thank you
    Helen

    • Hi Helen, You can skip the anchovy sauce or substitute it with salt or salted baby shrimp as you suggested. Though I haven’t made it with those ingredients myself so I can’t give you the exact amount. All I can say is keep experiment but add them less than 2 Tbsp. I would go for 1/8 tsp ground salt or 1/4 tsp ground salted baby shrimp as a starting point. :)

  2. Thank you so much for this link, Sue. It looks gorgeous and I can already imagine hiding some small bits of chicken to satisfy my carnivorous palate.
    You will laugh but thanks to you I will finally use the anchovy sauce I bought several months ago in a Korean grocery shop and never used since then. Thank you again!

  3. LOVE it

  4. My mom used to make this for me growing up….I miss it so much I could cry :’(

  5. Fantastic tasty recipe and mouth-watering pictures, thanks for sharing it, we make it every weekend since finding it.

    No phones for us at dinner time either!

    Thanks again,
    Drew

  6. Wow what lovely pictures
    i found your site today , i am sure i will come to it again and again.
    great recipe too.

    akshata

  7. It would be! I warned you. :)
    With rice it is OK but without the rice you need to reduce to half the amount of anchovy sauce.

  8. I made this tonight. It was good but a little salty. I’m going to try making it with dashimul (anchovy and kombu broth, less salty), instead of kombu and anchovy sauce, the next time.

    It was yummy and probably wouldn’t have seemed so salty if I’d eaten it with rice but I was too hungry to wait! Mea culpa.

  9. Kombu is the thick, wider, kelp strands, not the pressed seaweed sheets or thin strands of seaweed. In the stores it looks somewhat like a thin, dark green to black wooden slat.

  10. Marian,
    I used Kombu not Gim. Its Korean name is Dashima. However you can just add plain water. It still works fine. :)
    The containers I used for this dish aren’t quite same as ramekins but I think that would be fine too. I am looking forward to seeing your photos. Good luck!

  11. korean seaweed as in kim? the seasoned kind? ill try making this soon, you used ramekins for steaming right? i love ur small egg containers cute..not to big not to small. i will post a pic of this when i do make it. :)

  12. Sally, I steamed them in a stainless steel steamer on the stove.

    Cat, I bought the bowls near the Brisbane airport. :) You might be able to find similar ones in Seoul.

    Marian, I used a stainless steel steamer to steam. I don’t think any seaweed will be suitable for kombu. You can probably get some at a Korean grocery or Japanese grocery store.

    Anh, That’s good to hear. If you make another one, post the picture on your blog. I would like to see yours. :)

  13. I just did this tonight, didn’t take any photos though as I was a bit hungry and lazy :D -thanks for the simple recipe. The result was more delicious than I thought.

  14. i have a question, what containers did u use to steam them? these look soo good :) will any seedweed do for the kombu?

  15. These look so beautiful. I wish I could eat eggs now, but I can’t.

  16. So pretty, and I feel like eating these steamed eggs now! *drool*

  17. Yay! I love to eat gyeran jjim and now I know how to make it! Also, I love those cute colorful bowls! Where did you find them?

  18. One of my favorites too. Seeing it on your blog makes me crave it and I think I will have to make this tomorrow with some rice. My landlord showed me how to make it and she added a dab of sesame oil. Goodness… my mouth is watering!

  19. Sally Tan says:

    wow!!! your steamed eggs looks soooo good.
    In the korean restaurants here, I would eat them out of stone bowls. And they would really stick to the bowl.

    Are those baked?

  20. Hi Sue,

    I have been lurking around your blog for some time and it is now in my list of favourite blogs. I love Korean food but couldn’t cook it myself cos I didnt have any recipes. Your blog is great as it provides delicious and simple to follow recipes. I love your recipes! I have tried cooking some of them and the dishes always turn out great! I just made some Tuna Pancakes for dinner today:)

  21. Gyeran Jjim is one of my favourites. When I ordered it in Korea, it came in a much bigger bowl. I usually could not finish it after downing one bowl of rice. Quite a waste. Your portion looks just nice to go along with a bowl of rice.

  22. This looks like a variation of the Japanese chawamushi. Delicious!

  23. I don’t like interruptions while cooking either. These look delicious!

  24. Ahh, I don’t like gaeran jjim very much, but whenever my ma makes it, my brother goes nuts and devours it all but mixing it into his rice :D

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