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Korean Steamed Egg (Gyeran Jjim)

The ultimate Korean steamed egg guide. How to make Korean steamed egg in three different ways!

Korean Steamed Egg (Gyeran Jjim) | MyKoreanKitchen.com

Korean steamed egg (Gyeran Jim, 계란찜) is a popular Korean side dish. It somewhat resembles an egg soufflé but it typically doesn’t include dairy products and it is steamed instead of being baked.

It has a really nice pudding like texture and is slightly salty and savory. Just what every Korean kid (big or small) would love to eat with their hot steamed rice.

It is also a popular baby food. But obviously it would then be made a lot plainer.

I certainly enjoyed eating these eggs a lot while growing up. My mom would make them a few times a week.

Nowadays, I hear some Korean BBQ restaurants (in Korea) serve this steamed egg as a complimentary side dish when you order a bowl of rice after you order the Korean BBQ as a main meal. How cool is that? 🙂

How to Make Korean Steamed Egg (Gyeran Jjim) in a Korean Hot Stone Bowl | MyKoreanKitchen.com

Traditional Korean steamed egg is made in a Korean hot stone bowl called Ttukbaegi (뚝배기) and people can share the steamed egg from this pot.

When I originally shared my steamed egg recipe back in 2007, my eggs were cooked in a small ramekin.

I found that this was more practical and easier to serve without upsetting everyone about who ate the most of egg!

Over the years, I also learnt that some Koreans use a microwave to make Korean steamed egg too. As you can imagine, this method is very easy, quick and convenient!

So in today’s recipe, I will show you how to cook Korean steamed egg in three different ways. If you try them all out, tell us which methods you liked the most.

Enjoy!

P.S. If you like Korean steamed egg, you might also like to try my Korean egg bread and Korean egg roll recipe.

How to Make Korean Steamed Egg (Gyeran Jjim) | MyKoreanKitchen.com

Ingredients for Korean Steamed Egg, 3 to 4 servings

  • 6 large eggs
  • 20 g / 0.7 ounces dried sea kelp (kombu)
  • 1 and 1/2 cups water
  • 1 tsp anchovy sauce
  • 10 g / 0.35 ounces green onion, finely chopped
  • 20 g / 0.7 ounces carrot, finely chopped
  • Sesame oil

*For a variation, you can add other kinds of vegetables and even add some meat (e.g. shrimp is popular).

** 1 Tbsp = 15 ml, 1 Cup = 250 ml

How to Prepare Korean Steamed Egg

1. Soak the dried sea kelp in a bowl of water for 15 minutes.

Korean seafood stock for Korean steamed egg

2. Beat the eggs and strain once to remove any stringy bits such as chalazae.

Getting egg ready for Korean steamed egg

3. Discard the dried sea kelp then add the remaining water (from step 1) into the beaten egg bowl (step 2). Add the anchovy sauce, green onion, and carrot. Mix them well. Set aside.

Korean steamed egg mixture

How to Cook Korean Steamed Egg in a Microwave (Modern Korean Style)

1. Drop a small dose of sesame oil into each small heat resistant bowl (e.g.ramekin or mini casserole pot). Brush the oil around to cover the inside. This will minimize the egg sticking into the bowl. Also, it will add a nice nutty aroma and flavor.

Getting the bowls ready for Korean steamed egg

2. Pour the egg mixture into the small heat resistant bowls (up to 80% of the bowl) and cover the bowl with a small lid or cling wrap.

Egg mixture for Korean steamed egg

3. Place the bowls into the microwave and cook the egg for 5 minutes.  (This may vary depending on your microwave.)

How to cook Korean steamed egg in a microwave | MyKoreanKitchen.com

4. When the egg is cooked, remove from the microwave and serve.

Korean Steamed Egg Recipe | MyKoreanKitchen.com

How to Cook Korean Steamed Egg in a Steamer (Japanese Chawanmushi Style)

1. Drop a small dose of sesame oil into each small heat resistant bowl (e.g.ramekin). Brush the oil around to cover the inside. This will minimize the egg sticking into the bowl. Also, it will add a nice nutty aroma and flavor.

2. Pour the egg mixture into the small heat resistant bowls (up to 80% of the bowl) and cover the bowl with cling wrap or aluminium foil.

Korean steamed egg in a steamer pot

3. Boil some water on high heat in a steamer pot. When the water starts to rolling boil, place the egg filled bowls inside the steamer. Lower the heat to medium to low, and steam the bowls until the egg is cooked (about 15 to 20 minutes). Remove from the heat and serve.

How to Cook Korean Steamed Egg in a Steamer | MyKoreanKitchen.com

How to Cook Korean Steamed Egg in a Korean Hot Stone Bowl (Ttukbaegi, Traditional Korean Style)

1. Drop a small dose of sesame oil into the hot stone bowl (ttukbaegi). Brush the oil around to cover the inside. This will minimize the egg sticking into the bowl. Also, it will add a nice nutty aroma and flavor.

2. Pour the egg mixture into the bowl (up to 80% of the bowl).

Boiling egg mixture in a Korean hot stone bowl

3. Boil the bowl over medium high heat for about 3 minutes then reduce the heat to medium low to low. Cover with a lid and simmer until the egg is cooked (about 10 to 15 minutes). Serve.

Cooking Korean steamed egg in a Korean hot stone bowl (ttukbaegi)


How to Make Korean Steamed Egg (Gyeran Jjim) | MyKoreanKitchen.com

Korean Steamed Egg (Gyeran Jjim)

How to make Korean steamed egg in three different ways
4.67 from 6 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: Side dishes
Cuisine: Korean
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Total Time: 45 minutes
Servings: 3
Calories: 146
Author: Sue | My Korean Kitchen

Ingredients

  • 6 large eggs
  • 20 g dried sea kelp (0.7 ounces), (kombu)
  • 1 1/2 cup water
  • 1 tsp anchovy sauce
  • 10 g green onion (0.35 ounces), finely chopped
  • 20 g carrot (0.7 ounces), finely chopped
  • sesame oil

Instructions

HOW TO PREPARE KOREAN STEAMED EGG

  • Soak the dried sea kelp in a bowl of water for 15 minutes.
  • Beat the eggs and strain once to remove any stringy bits such as chalazae.
  • Discard the dried sea kelp then add the remaining water (from step 1) into the beaten egg bowl (step 2). Add the anchovy sauce, green onion, and carrot. Mix them well. Set aside.

HOW TO COOK KOREAN STEAMED EGG IN A MICROWAVE (MODERN KOREAN STYLE)

  • Drop a small dose of sesame oil into each small heat resistant bowl (e.g.ramekin or mini casserole pot). Brush the oil around to cover the inside. This will minimize the egg sticking into the bowl. Also, it will add a nice nutty aroma and flavor.
  • Pour the egg mixture into the small heat resistant bowls (up to 80% of the bowl) and cover the bowl with a small lid or cling wrap.
  • Place the bowls into the microwave and cook the egg for 5 minutes. (This may vary depending on your microwave.)
  • When the egg is cooked, remove from the microwave and serve.

HOW TO COOK KOREAN STEAMED EGG IN A STEAMER (JAPANESE CHAWANMUSHI STYLE)

  • Drop a small dose of sesame oil into each small heat resistant bowl (e.g.ramekin). Brush the oil around to cover the inside. This will minimize the egg sticking into the bowl. Also, it will add a nice nutty aroma and flavor.
  • Pour the egg mixture into the small heat resistant bowls (up to 80% of the bowl) and cover the bowl with cling wrap or aluminium foil.
  • Boil some water on high heat in a steamer pot. When the water starts to rolling boil, place the egg filled bowls inside the steamer. Lower the heat to medium to low, and steam the bowls until the egg is cooked (about 15 to 20 minutes). Remove from the heat and serve.

HOW TO COOK KOREAN STEAMED EGG IN A KOREAN HOT STONE BOWL (TTUKBAEGI, TRADITIONAL KOREAN STYLE)

  • Drop a small dose of sesame oil into the hot stone bowl (ttukbaegi). Brush the oil around to cover the inside. This will minimize the egg sticking into the bowl. Also, it will add a nice nutty aroma and flavor.
  • Pour the egg mixture into the bowl (up to 80% of the bowl).
  • Boil the bowl over medium high heat for about 3 minutes then reduce the heat to medium low to low. Cover with a lid and simmer until the egg is cooked (about 10 to 15 minutes). Serve.

Notes

** 1 Tbsp = 15 ml, 1 Cup = 250 ml

Nutrition

Calories: 146kcal | Carbohydrates: 2g | Protein: 11g | Fat: 9g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Cholesterol: 327mg | Sodium: 308mg | Potassium: 142mg | Vitamin A: 1620IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 64mg | Iron: 1.7mg
Tried this recipe?I love hearing how you went with my recipes! Leave a comment below or Tag me on Instagram @MyKoreanKitchen.

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Written by: Sue

Last Updated: May 13, 2019

Hi, I'm Sue and I am the creator of My Korean Kitchen. Thank you for joining me in this delicious culinary journey!

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34 thoughts on “Korean Steamed Egg (Gyeran Jjim)”

  1. I keep trying to make this in the microwave but there’s always liquid at the bottom and then I overcook, which then turns the eggs spongy. What am I doing wrong? HELP!

    • Hi Joy, it’s normal to have a little bit of clear liquid at the bottom of the bowl. But if you have yellow egg liquid, that means it’s undercooked. You just need to cook extra 1-2 mins to cook that off. The timing will vary depend on your microwave power.

      How long do you normally cook? After 5 mins of microwaving, I’d check in every minute to find the sweet spot until you become familiar with your setting. Hope this helps!

  2. I had this as a side, could not finish all so I took the rest of the meal home, This dish needs to be eaten hot not two day old microwave. Learn something everyday.

  3. Sounds delicious. Steamed egg is also a really popular kids snack here in China, but we make it simple with a dash of milk and sugar.

    The kelp is a great idea, especially as my kids are addicted to seaweed sticks.

  4. 계란찜!!!!!! I love your blog so much. I wondered how to make it in my small kitchen and you propose the microwave way. So happy thank you ^^

    • Thank you! We love the microwave method. The easiest and the quickest. Also, I find that the egg is silkier than the other two methods. Enjoy!

  5. hi Sue
    I love your steam egg recipe! I’ve tried on my own but could never get the egg/water ratio right.
    My daughter has a fish allergy though, can you suggest any alternatives to anchovy sauce?
    even just Salt or salted baby shrimp (sae ooh jut?) just don’t know how much would be good.
    thank you
    Helen

    • Hi Helen, You can skip the anchovy sauce and substitute it with salt or salted baby shrimp as you suggested. Though I haven’t made it with those ingredients myself so I can’t give you the exact amount. All I can say is keep experiment but add them less than 1 tsp. I would go for 1/8 tsp ground salt or 1/4 tsp ground salted baby shrimp as a starting point. 🙂

  6. Thank you so much for this link, Sue. It looks gorgeous and I can already imagine hiding some small bits of chicken to satisfy my carnivorous palate.
    You will laugh but thanks to you I will finally use the anchovy sauce I bought several months ago in a Korean grocery shop and never used since then. Thank you again!

  7. Kombu is the thick, wider, kelp strands, not the pressed seaweed sheets or thin strands of seaweed. In the stores it looks somewhat like a thin, dark green to black wooden slat.

  8. Marian,
    I used Kombu not Gim. Its Korean name is Dashima. However you can just add plain water. It still works fine. 🙂
    The containers I used for this dish aren’t quite same as ramekins but I think that would be fine too. I am looking forward to seeing your photos. Good luck!

  9. korean seaweed as in kim? the seasoned kind? ill try making this soon, you used ramekins for steaming right? i love ur small egg containers cute..not to big not to small. i will post a pic of this when i do make it. 🙂

  10. Sally, I steamed them in a stainless steel steamer on the stove.

    Cat, I bought the bowls near the Brisbane airport. 🙂 You might be able to find similar ones in Seoul.

    Marian, I used a stainless steel steamer to steam. Also, not all seaweed is suitable substitutes for kombu. You can probably get some at a Korean grocery or Japanese grocery store.

    Anh, That’s good to hear. If you make another one, post the picture on your blog. I would like to see yours. 🙂

  11. I just did this tonight, didn’t take any photos though as I was a bit hungry and lazy 😀 -thanks for the simple recipe. The result was more delicious than I thought.

  12. One of my favorites too. Seeing it on your blog makes me crave it and I think I will have to make this tomorrow with some rice. My landlord showed me how to make it and she added a dab of sesame oil. Goodness… my mouth is watering!

  13. wow!!! your steamed eggs looks soooo good.
    In the korean restaurants here, I would eat them out of stone bowls. And they would really stick to the bowl.

    Are those baked?

  14. Hi Sue,

    I have been lurking around your blog for some time and it is now in my list of favourite blogs. I love Korean food but couldn’t cook it myself cos I didnt have any recipes. Your blog is great as it provides delicious and simple to follow recipes. I love your recipes! I have tried cooking some of them and the dishes always turn out great! I just made some Tuna Pancakes for dinner today:)

  15. Gyeran Jjim is one of my favourites. When I ordered it in Korea, it came in a much bigger bowl. I usually could not finish it after downing one bowl of rice. Quite a waste. Your portion looks just nice to go along with a bowl of rice.

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