Homemade Melona Bar (Honeydew Melon Ice Pops)

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Melona Bar (Honeydew Ice Pops) 1

One of my childhood favourite ice creams was Melona (메로나) – Honeydew melon ice pop. I used to buy it for 100 won (about AU$0.10). It was quite a uniquely flavoured ice cream for that time. The slightly creamy but not overwhelmingly creamy and elegantly chewy texture was very different to any other popsicles around.

Melona is one of best-selling ice cream brands in Korea and there are/were lots of copycat ice pops too. But the most famous brand is Melona (메로나) by Binggrae. I didn’t know how popular this ice cream is around the world until I decided to make it myself. Would you agree? Is it popular in your country? Have you all tasted Melona before?

I also found an interesting fact about Melona. Apparently, it was made to taste more like yellow melon (Korean hybrid -Chamoe 참외) rather than honeydew melon because most Koreans weren’t used to the honeydew melon taste back then (in 1992). Regardless, I was very surprised to find out this fact myself! (If you can read Korean, you can find it yourself from this news article.)

Melona Bar (Honeydew Ice Pops) 2

Before I started making Melona at home, I really wanted to try the original version.  Because I only remembered the taste from my vague memory from 5-10 years ago! But, alas, I couldn’t find it even at a Korean grocery store I considered big here in Brisbane. So off I went researching for the recipe both in Korean and English, Here, here and here, but none of them seemed to have a good review.

After attempting three times, using various combinations of sweetening – caster sugar, sweet condensed milk, corn syrup and honey etc – and guess-work of course, I came up with the below recipe. The main thing I couldn’t imitate was giving the ice pop a softer chewy texture instead of an icy hard texture. Meanwhile, at least I can say that it contains 100% “real” honeydew melon  (not just 0.15% melon syrup) and no artificial additives!

Let me know how yours turn out! It’s super easy and simple to make at home.

Ingredients for 6 Melona pops (Cooking time 15 -20 mins excl. the freezing time of 6 hrs)

  • ½  ripe honeydew melon (600g of flesh)
  • ¼  cup natural cream (not thick cream)
  • 1 tbsp of honey (if you like really sweet ice cream, you could add more)

Steps

1. Pour the cream into a pot and add the honey. Boil and stir it on low medium to low heat for about 3 mins. (Stir well to dissolve the honey and not to burn the cream). Turn off the heat, set it aside and cool it down for about 5 mins.

Melting honey in cream for Melona bar
2. Cut the cleaned honeydew melon into small chunks and put them into a food processor/blender. Blend it until it turns to puree.

Blending Melon for Melona bar

3. Mix step 1 and step 2 in a bowl. whisk well.

Mixing Melon with cream & honey4. Pour the puree cream mixture into ice pop moulds and freeze it for at least 6 hours.

Freezing Melona Bar
5. Claim your reward by licking, biting and slurping!

Homemade ver 3 Melona

Note:

You could use an ice cream maker for (possible) extra softness before step 4. Use it per your manufacturer’s manual. (Though I am not really sure whether it actually makes it any softer. I used my ice cream maker in my first trial and I didn’t think it was any softer.)

P.S. My wonderful sister found a store selling melon bar ice pops (different brand but very similar taste) just before I finished this article. The store-bought melon pops have a much stronger flavour than the ones I made, but at least I have control of what are in mine.

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4.0 from 1 reviews
Homemade Melona Bar (Honeydew Melon Ice Pops)
 
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Dessert
Cuisine: Korean
Serves: 6
Ingredients
  • ½ ripe honeydew melon (600g of flesh)
  • ¼ cup natural cream (not thick cream)
  • 1 tbsp of honey (if you like really sweet ice cream, you could add more)
Instructions
  1. Pour the cream into a pot and add the honey. Boil and stir it on low medium to low heat for about 3 mins. (Stir well to dissolve the honey and not to burn the cream). Turn off the heat, set it aside and cool it down for about 5 mins.
  2. Cut the cleaned honeydew melon into small chunks and put them into a food processor/blender. Blend it until it turns to puree.
  3. Mix step 1 and step 2 in a bowl. whisk well.
  4. Pour the puree cream mixture into ice pop moulds and freeze it for at least 6 hours.
  5. Claim your reward by licking, biting and slurping!

 

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About Sue

Hi, I'm Sue and I am the author/cook/photographer behind My Korean Kitchen. Thank you for joining me in this delicious culinary journey!

Comments

  1. For a baker in the United states, what is the equivalent of natural cream? I assume it’s not whipping cream, but maybe half and half? Whole milk? Looking forward to making these today from my csa box honeydew!

    • Hi Marsha, as I’m not much of a baker, I don’t know what’s equivalent of natural cream. All I can say is, it’s not whipping cream but you can make a whipped cream with it. This natural cream does not contain any sugar or anything artificial ingredients, it’s pure 100% cream. The texture is runny like milk but a bit thicker but not as thick as thickened cream. I did my best to describe this I hope you can find something equivalent in the US! I am not familiar with the names of cream in the USA, but it could be Whole Milk Cream.

      • What you’re describing is exactly what what we here in the US call heavy cream. It’s made from whole milk and is the only natural product from which whipped cream can be made here. I guess I should have used the term heavy cream instead of whipping cream. It has one of the highest fat contents, and makes dairy products like ice cream have the recognizable creamy texture.

  2. It doesn’t look as creamy…is it nice and thick like the actual melona pop?

    • As I explained about the outcome of this recipe in the post, it’s not as rich creamy as real melona pop. I think you will have to add some artificial agents to make it like that.

  3. Omg I absolutely LOVE MELONA <3 It was the first thing I ate on the night I arrived at Korea. Thank you for this recipe! Hope to try it out :)

  4. Im from Singapore and I just ate a Melona ice cream. Soft and tasty. I wonder why the supermarket sells this even if it’s not a Korean one.

  5. Spent some months in Beijing a few years ago and the Chinese version was an almost daily guilty pleasure – they also have an icepop made with sweetcorn which is pretty nice, but the melon is my fav. I can’t remember the quantities for sure, but I think a small amount of liquid glycerine will help you get it softer – it works in sorbets. Here in London, which is still cold and dreary this morning, honeydew season is just about to begin…so hopefully, I’ll be able to let you know…

    • Thanks for the glycerine tip. I will give it a try next time. Hope you enjoy the recipe! You shouldn’t need to feel any guilt with the homemade version. They are pretty healthy! ;)

  6. I LOVE Melona pops! My sister and I tried them a couple of months ago for the first time, we found them at our big Korean grocery store here – instantly addicted. Also, I can’t believe how many came in one bag.

    • I know, it has pretty addictive taste, right? Though, when I had the copycat version of melona the other day (it was called “Melon bar”), it was overly sweet. (Too artificial taste for my taste buds)

  7. I recently started following your blog, and I just wanted to tell you that I love it!

    Thank you for posting this recipe about Melona bars — I used to buy them when I lived in Korea, and even now, they still call to me when I go to the Korean grocers.

    I wanted to make a suggestion for keeping the ice cream softer. Have you tried cornstarch? I use it when I make strawberry sorbet, and that really seems to keep my sorbet smoother and silkier. Here is a link to my recipe for sorbet on Bigoven.com. That will give you some sense of the proportions I use.

    http://www.bigoven.com/recipe/316676/Sweet-and-Silky-Strawberry-Sorbet

    Another thing I’ve noticed is that when I make sorbet, if I freeze it in a mold right away, it gets really hard. Also, if I use an ice cream maker and over-churn it, it will get super hard in the freezer. Maybe you could try an ice cream maker again, but just turn it enough add air and get it to a soft solid state. Then try packing it into your mold.

    Anyway, your recipe looks yummy. I can’t wait until summer to try it out!

    • Thanks Julie,
      I will definitely give an another try using corn starch! Though I will have to wait until the next honeydew melon season. It’s just finished here I think.

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