Never miss a new recipe Subscribe

Hotteok (Korean Sweet Pancakes)

39.7K Shares

Learn to make popular Korean winter street food – Hotteok (Korean sweet pancakes). It’s crispy outside and inside is filled with sweet gooey indulgence!

How to make popular Korean winter street food - Korean sweet pancakes (Hotteok). It's the ultimate sweet comfort! | MyKoreanKitchen.com

Today I’m sharing my sweet tooth love with you. I’m here to present my Korean sweet pancakes (Hotteok, Hoddeok or Hodduk, 호떡) recipe! My original recipe is like 9 years old now and I wanted to revamp this recipe for a while with a better, clearer & quicker version and some new photos.

Seriously, these Korean sweet pancakes used to be my favourite childhood snack! I was always excited tagging along with my mum when she went grocery shopping. Because it meant I would get an opportunity to have some pancakes on my way home! Who would say no to that?!

How to make popular Korean winter street food - Korean sweet pancakes (Hotteok). It's the ultimate sweet comfort! | MyKoreanKitchen.com

Some facts about Hotteok (Korean sweet pancakes)

  • Korean sweet pancakes (Hotteok) are one of the most popular Korean street snacks. They are particularly popular in winter.
  • They were introduced by Chinese immigrants in the early 1900s in Korea.
  • Typically they are stuffed with dark brown sugar, cinnamon powder & some grounded nuts or seeds but in recent times savoury style pancakes (vegetable, Kimchi, Bulgogi or cheese etc. stuffed) are also available.
  • Commonly the colour of the uncooked pancake (dough) is white but green tea coloured and flavoured pancakes are also available.
  • You can also buy premix versions from a Korean grocery store.

I haven’t tried vegetable stuffed versions yet but whether I do or not, I know my love will always be with the sweetened pancakes. 🙂 It really smells and tastes heavenly. It’s stuffed with sweet gooey syrup. ? Who can resist it?! Give it a try and let me know what you thought of it!

How to make popular Korean winter street food - Korean sweet pancakes (Hotteok). It's the ultimate sweet comfort! | MyKoreanKitchen.com

Ingredients for Hotteok, 6 pancakes (medium size)

Main

  • 1 & 1/4 cup (157 g, 5.5 ounces) all purpose flour
  • 1/2 tsp fine sea salt
  • 1 tsp white sugar
  • 1 tsp instant dry yeast
  • 1/2 cup (125ml) lukewarm milk
  • Some cooking oil

Fillings (mix these well in a bowl)

  • 1/4 cup dark brown sugar
  • 1/4 tsp cinnamon powder
  • 2 Tbsp crushed nuts of your choice (I used walnuts. Peanuts, almond slices and sunflower seeds are also popular choices.)

*1 cup = 250ml, 1 Tbsp = 15ml

How to Make Hotteok

1. Sieve through the flour into a large bowl then add the salt, sugar, yeast and milk. Mix them well into a dough and cover the bowl with plastic wrap. Ferment it at a comfortable room temperature until the dough doubles in size. (Mine took 1 hour at room temperature 27 C/80.6 F but it could vary depending on the effectiveness of your yeast and also your room temperature.)

Korean sweet pancakes (Hotteok) | MyKoreanKitchen.com

2. Once the dough is raised, release the gas by punching the dough with your hands a few times. Cover with the wrap again and rest for another 20 mins.

Korean sweet pancakes (Hotteok) | MyKoreanKitchen.com

3. When the dough is ready, put some cooking oil on your hands (for anti stick purpose) and separate the dough to allow 6 medium sized pancakes to be made.

Korean sweet pancakes (Hotteok) | MyKoreanKitchen.com

4. Put one of the pieces of dough on your hand, flatten the dough with your hands so that you can add about 1 Tbsp size filling onto it. Once it’s done, seal the dough by gathering the corners. Repeat this for the remaining dough.

Korean sweet pancakes (Hotteok) | MyKoreanKitchen.com

5. Pre heat a frying pan on medium heat and once it’s heated add a thin layer of cooking oil.

6. Place a dough (1 or more depending on size of your pan. If more, allow enough room to expand between the dough when pressed down) into the pan and cook it on medium heat until the bottom side is lightly golden brown (about 30 seconds). Flip it over and press the dough down with a solid turner or professional press. Cook until the bottom part is golden brown (about 1 min). Flip the pancake over one last time then reduce the heat to low. Cover the pan with a lid and cook until the sugar filing fully melts (about 1 min).  – It is still edible if you don’t further cook with a lid on but not all the sugar filling will be melted.

Korean sweet pancakes (Hotteok) | MyKoreanKitchen.com

7. Transfer the pancake onto a plate and repeat step 6 for the remaining dough. Enjoy hot!

How to make popular Korean winter street food - Korean sweet pancakes (Hotteok). It's the ultimate sweet comfort! | MyKoreanKitchen.com

Korean sweet pancakes (Hotteok) | MyKoreanKitchen.com

Note

  • It tastes best when you eat it while it’s still “bearably” hot. Take extra caution when you approach the sugar filling as it can be really hot especially for young children.
  • I used instant dry yeast in this recipe, so I didn’t need to activate (proof) before adding it to rest of the dough ingredients. You can learn more about active dry yeast and instant yeast from this article.
  • If you’re allergic to dairy products, you can use water instead of milk. (Though I haven’t tried this way.)
  • It is best to consume all the pancakes on the day of making them. While it reheats well in a microwave the filling isn’t as gooey after a while as it’s mostly soaked into the dough (the gooey filling is part of its attraction!).


How to make popular Korean winter street food - Korean sweet pancakes (Hotteok). It's the ultimate sweet comfort! | MyKoreanKitchen.com

Hotteok (Korean Sweet Pancakes)

Hotteok (Korean sweet pancakes) recipe
4.92 from 34 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: Snacks
Cuisine: Korean
Prep Time: 1 hour 35 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 50 minutes
Servings: 6
Calories: 174kcal

Ingredients

  • 1 1/4 cup all purpose flour (157 g / 5.5 ounces)
  • 1/2 tsp fine sea salt
  • 1 tsp white sugar
  • 1 tsp instant dry yeast
  • 1/2 cup lukewarm milk (125 ml)
  • Some cooking oil

Fillings (mix these well in a bowl)

  • 1/4 cup dark brown sugar
  • 1/4 tsp cinnamon powder
  • 2 Tbsp crushed nuts of your choice (I used walnuts. Peanuts, almond slices and sunflower seeds are also popular choices.)

Instructions

  • Sieve through the flour into a large bowl then add the salt, sugar, yeast and milk. Mix them well into a dough and cover the bowl with plastic wrap. Ferment it at a comfortable room temperature until the dough doubles in size. (Mine took 1 hour at room temperature 27 C/80.6 F but it could vary depending on the effectiveness of your yeast and also your room temperature.)
  • Once the dough is raised, release the gas by punching the dough with your hands a few times. Cover with the wrap again and rest for another 20 mins.
  • When the dough is ready, put some cooking oil on your hands (for anti stick purpose) and separate the dough to allow 6 medium sized pancakes to be made.
  • Put one of the pieces of dough on your hand, flatten the dough with your hands so that you can add about 1 Tbsp size filling onto it. Once it’s done, seal the dough by gathering the corners. Repeat this for the remaining dough.
  • Pre heat a frying pan on medium heat and once it’s heated add a thin layer of cooking oil.
  • Place a dough (1 or more depending on size of your pan. If more, allow enough room to expand between the dough when pressed down) into the pan and cook it on medium heat until the bottom side is lightly golden brown (about 30 seconds). Flip it over and press the dough down with a solid turner or professional hotteok press. Cook until the bottom part is golden brown (about 1 min). Flip the pancake over one last time then reduce the heat to low. Cover the pan with a lid and cook until the sugar filing fully melts (about 1 min). – It is still edible if you don’t further cook with a lid on but not all the sugar filling will be melted.
  • Transfer the pancake onto a plate and repeat step 6 for the remaining dough. Enjoy hot!

Nutrition Info (per serving)

Calories: 174kcal

The nutrition information shown is an estimate provided by an online nutrition calculator. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist’s advice.

Tried this recipe?I love hearing how you went with my recipes! Rate this recipe with a comment below and tag me on Instagram @MyKoreanKitchen.

 

39.7K Shares

You May Also Like

Written by: Sue

Last Updated: May 13, 2019
Sue and My Korean Kitchen Profile

Welcome to my Korean kitchen! I’m so happy that you're here. I am Sue, the creator behind My Korean Kitchen (since 2006). I love good food and simplifying recipes. Here you will find my best and family approved recipes. Thanks for stopping by!

Leave a Comment

Rate This Recipe With Your Comment




96 thoughts on “Hotteok (Korean Sweet Pancakes)”

  1. Very good explanations, I made it first time and I love it.
    It’s not as it should be and my guest who are Korean were very nice and said it’s great😊. I realized that using dark brown sugar is better, I had none so I used palm light brown sugar. Hopefully next time it will be better. Thank you for your post.
    Sanela

    Reply
  2. Hi! Tried this recipe today and we love it. My question is, can I make the dough with the filling inside the night before I want to cook these? Thanks

    Reply
    • The yeast will not stay active that long and will stop giving the dough its “lightness.” I’m guessing the dough will likely feel flat, thick, and stiff if left overnight. Rising agents have a “time limit” before they need to be used once activated by liquid. You might be able to do the cooking up until the point of where you need to melt the inside, and then reheat them in an oven to melt them the next day? (Not sure on hotteok, but I’ve used that technique on other items I’ve baked.) However, like all bread/pastry based products, these will be best on the first day they’re made.

      Reply
    • I haven’t baked these pancakes in the oven so I can’t give you much advice. However, I don’t think it’s very practical to cook them in the oven.

      Reply
    • Can’t speak to hotteok directly (as I’ve never tried a non-traditional cooking method), but baking any kind of “pancake-type product” will have a different effect. You could theoretically bake them in a greased cast iron skillet that’s heated very hot, but only one side would get “pan fried.” For an example look up “Dutch Baby pancake” vs. a regular pancake. Cooking method is very important. I’m not sure what time and temperature would be needed, but the end result would have a very different texture.

      They’re very easy to make on the stove, though!

      Reply
    • I have not tried cooking these pancakes in an air fryer, but I don’t think it will work well. You will need generous amount of oil to cook the pancakes. Also, it can get very messy when you press the pancakes down in an air fryer basket.

      Reply
  3. Hi Sue, this was delicious!! But the dough was really difficult to handle. It could be due to the humidity where I live? What would you recommend to make the dough less sticky?

    Reply
    • Hotteok dough is quite sticky as it is, but yes, I also have read that humidity do affect when you bake (i.e working with a dough). You can possibly use less milk in the dough. And/or add more flour too. Hope your next one works out better!

      Reply
    • On really humid days, I sometimes find I need to add a little extra flour to all my baked goods. I generally do it a Tbsp. at a time. Also, more time for the dough to sit can help. Sometimes, when the glutens aren’t finished doing their thing with the yeast, the dough can be stickier than when it’s sat for as long as it needs. (There’s a whole scientific explanation I got once, but that was the tl;dr version.)

      I agree with the others about generously oiling my hands!

      Reply
  4. This was my first time making hotteok and I think it came out great I’m not sure how it would taste in korea since I’ve never tried but every korean youtuber i watch is either making it from scratch or buying pre made mix, maybe I could’ve kept the filling in the middle it would’ve come out better or if I let the dough rest more but I think it came out delicious and I followed the steps so I’m very proud of what I made (I took pictures too but idk if I can post them)

    Reply
  5. Hi! Do you think the recipe would work if I replaced some of the all purpose flour with a bit of glutinous rice flour? I want it gooey and chewy! Thanks

    Reply
    • You can certainly try it. I wouldn’t know if it will give you the texture you’re after without further testing it myself though. 🙂

      Reply
  6. Hi Sue,
    I tried making the hotteok today(opps forgot to take photos though) i used natural honey instead of sugar as i am diabetic and staying of sugar. It is heavenly maybe not as good as what you had. I enjoyed it with my hisband ( practically forced him😀.
    Thanks to the stay at home i could go through your recopes and make all the fun dishes.
    I hope you are all good!

    By the way i am Nigerian resident in Dubai who loves korean food and kdrama ( my sleeping pills)

    Reply
  7. Hey Sue ,
    I did really try this recipe and it was good. since i am from Philippines and lived in Seoul for 11 yrs i sincerely miss korean foods. Now we live in US. i did a different kind of fillings like sweet purple yum , sweet mongo beans and it was delicious. i shared it with my filipino friends and they loved it too.

    Reply
  8. I made a double batch this morning. They were super easy to make, and really delicious. I had a serious craving for peanut butter, so I made three of them filled with peanut butter and jelly. So good! I’m planning to try lots of combinations. These are so filling, we couldn’t eat them all for breakfast so we had leftovers for dessert tonight. They reheated really nicely in the toaster oven.

    Reply
  9. Tried this today and it’s really good and easy!
    I only made 1/4 recipe as i am afraid it’ll fail, but now i regret it lol
    I modified the filling since I don’t have cinnamon and nuts, so i used brown sugar and powdered chocolate.
    Will definitely try the original one with cinnamon and nuts once the quarantine is over!

    Reply
  10. I loved your recipe and the instructions were super clear❤️
    I was just wondering the thickness you should aim for and if you have any tips on making them thinner if you don’t own a stamper?
    Mine turned out probably just under 3cm thick but I was too scared to press it down more in case they split or stuck to my hand!😂

    Reply
  11. My first time cooking Korean street food, and it came out really well. I’ve been wanting to make something Korean in celebration of Asian and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, but I didn’t have a lot of ingredients because of quarantine. This recipe was really simple and easy to follow and I would definitely recommend it!

    Reply
  12. Hi, i have a few questions so…
    What should I do if I wanted to make more servings?
    and can I use white sugar since I don’t have brown sugar?

    Reply
    • A1) You can double the recipe if you want to make more.
      Also, if you go to the “recipe card” above, you will see the “servings”. Hover over your computer mouse cursor then an adjustment bar will appear. When you change the serving size, it will automatically update the ingredients quantity needed for that serving size. Hope this helps.

      A2) Brown sugar is definitely ideal in this recipe, but if all you have is white sugar, why not just try it. 🙂

      Reply
  13. Thank you for the recipe! Not having a Korean grocer nearby it is so nice to find a recipe where I can make this treat at home from scratch!

    Reply
  14. Thank you so much for sharing this! I tried these today and the steps were so easy to follow and they came out great! I most of them straight away lol. I will definitely be making these again maybe trying different nuts (I used walnuts today as you did 😊)

    Reply
  15. My dough barely rised even after 2 hours so I was thinking of throwing it out but I went ahead and did the rest of the recipe and it still turned out great! Thanks for the recipe!

    Reply
  16. These taste exactly like the 호떡 in the 시장! I’ve made this about three times, and for someone with little experience in cooking sweet Korean dishes, this one was really easy, accurate, and tasty!

    Reply
  17. Hi! I haven’t tried this recipe yet but I wanted to make them for Christmas. Do you think it would be okay to prepare them a day before? Either prepping the dough or also filling them and forming them into the balls. I don’t want them to get soggy or anything overnight.

    Reply
    • Obviously, it’s best to prep, cook and eat all on the same day.

      Some people told me that they were able to prepare the dough the day before then fill with the sugar and make hotteok the day after successfully. I haven’t tried it myself this way, so I can’t be sure. I hope it works out well for you.

      Reply
  18. Turned out amazing!! Super yummy!! may be a lil unhealthy but that’s okay 😉

    For those who don’t have yeast: I didn’t have yeast lying around so I substituted the yeast for 1 tbsp of baking powder and instead of the milk, used 1/4 cup plain yogurt and 1/4 cup water mixed together to have a more milky consistency (because the baking powder needs an acid to react with which comes from the yogurt). Add more water as needed to make the dough, well doughy. But be careful, don’t get too generous with the water or your dough will turn out a very sticky mess. Great thing about this method is you don’t have to let the dough prove or chill in the fridge, you can use the dough right away!!

    Reply
  19. I have not made the sweet version before. I have only made and eaten the more savory one. It is really good. The dough is very tricky to manipulate.

    Reply
  20. I was curious if with your recipe I could even stuff them with extra things for example cheese? Or I need another recipe for that? Thank you. 💜

    Reply
  21. We do have this version in the Philippines but we actually call it Piaya. It’s absolutely delicious as it also comes with different varieties. Honestly, I didn’t know that Korean has its version as well.

    Reply
  22. Hi. I love this dish a lot and have made some before. Just a quick note – I don’t think the oil should be put in there since it’s just for separating the dough. It confused me enough that I accidentally put it in. Just something that bothered me a teeny tiny bit 🙂 This shouldn’t change much, though?

    Reply
  23. My daughter (14yo) loves all things Korean and became an expert in making Hotteok! We double or (next time) even triple Your recipe, so the kids can take leftovers to school. With the sweet stuffing there’s no need for anything extra, so very convenient. Thanks a lot for all your recipes!
    Best,
    Florian (instagram: @roteboote)

    Reply
  24. I would like to take these to a dinner party. Can I make the dough and fill the balls at home and fry a few hours later (after dinner). I was hoping t make th dough in morning ; refrigerate, fry after dinner – will this work

    Reply
  25. I tried these pancakes recently when I visited a street market in Busan. They were just delicious and I had to have a second one but the cooking method looked different. They seemed to be cooking the pancakes in a liquid. Do you know what that would have been? It didn’t look like oil. When it was cooked it was cut open and stuffed with the nut and seed mixture. Yum! I now want to make them. 🙂

    Reply
    • I don’t know what that liquid might be. I was going to say “oil”. Also, there are different types of hotteok available nowadays. This recipe is traditional style.

      Reply
      • Well, I got curious and had a look on youtube and lo and behold someone had filmed the actual stall I bought my hotteok from! here’s the link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RuxFCxlgkW8 I think it must have been oil but it looked more liquidy than oil and there wasn’t any sizzly frying noise. Looking at the video the woman preparing the dough seems to be putting cinnamon into it so maybe that has coloured the oil. However, I am now a big fan of hotteok and have bookmarked your recipe to try it! 😀

        Reply
  26. I am hoping on making these for a large group as part of a dinner party. Do you have any suggestions on how I could make them ahead of time to cut down on the preparation time just before the party. Could I have each little pancake prepared and filled the night before and then cook them just before the party?

    Reply
    • Hi Amy, I don’t think making it the night before and cooking it the next day will work well. I have an experience with a similar dessert (https://mykoreankitchen.com/nutella-stuffed-sweet-rice-flour-doughnut-holes/) and it was pretty messy experience with only 50% success rate. You should read my comment in the ‘Note’ section of the link above.
      If you’re pressed with time, cook all the way the day before and just reheat it before the party. Though the filling won’t be gooey. And in my opinion, that’s the best part about these pancakes! 🙂

      Reply
      • Thanks. Have you ever used the oven to reheat instead of the microwave? Any difference? Or do you think I can cook them a few hours earlier and keep them warm somehow? Suggestions. I do love the gooey filling as well so I am trying to see how to keep that while still making ahead.

        Reply
        • I haven’t tried oven to reheat or to keep them warm. (Only tried microwaving and the outcome wasn’t gooey.) Maybe you can try and see how it turns out in the oven. I don’t know when you’re planning a party, it would be best trying out beforehand anyway. 🙂

          Reply
  27. I love hoddeok so much, but it’s getting so difficult to find it on the streets of Seoul, so I decided to try to wing it and make my own this winter. They were good, but these look better. I’ll have to try this recipe next time.

    Reply
  28. Yummmmy, I am making these once I am done with my whole 30 diet I have been doing, which has been getting rid of the stubborn 10 pounds of baby weight that wouldn’t go away. 🙂 Every recipe I have made of yours has been amazing.

    Reply
  29. Oh yum! I’ve never been to Korea and will probably never get the chance to go, but thank goodness (andSue) I don’t have to miss out on one of the world’great cuisines. I am so making these pancakes for dessert tonight.

    Reply
  30. In the picture, you have a plate and something else on top of the pancake. What is the thing on top of the plate? Where can I find this tool?

    Reply
  31. I’m so going to try doing this at home. I’m so happy that I have found a website where I can find so many recipe for Korean food. I can’t wait to make these and share them with my besties. ❤?

    Reply

Leave a Comment

Rate This Recipe With Your Comment




NEVER MISS A NEW RECIPE

Join 20,000+ other Korean food lovers! Get the latest recipes from

My Korean Kitchen delivered to your email inbox. It's free!