Never miss a new recipe Subscribe

Gungjung Tteokbokki (Korean Royal Court Rice Cakes)

Gungjung Tteokbokki is a Korean royal court cuisine that originated from the royal palace in the Joseon dynasty. Gungjung means “palace or royal court” in English. It is known as king’s snack. Unlike typical Tteokbokki (Korean spicy rice cakes), Gungjung Tteokbokki is not spicy but rather savoury.

Gungjung Tteokbokki (Korean Royal Court Rice Cakes) | MyKoreanKitchen.com

Gungjung Tteokbokki VS. Tteokbokki

If you are familiar with Korean food, you have probably heard of Tteokbokki (떡볶이). Typically Tteokbokki means Korean spicy rice cakes. White cylinder shaped rice cakes are stir fried with Korean fish cakes and Korean spicy sauce.

On the other hand, Gungjung Tteokbokki (궁중 떡볶이) is cooked with a soy sauce based sauce, so some people call it Ganjang Tteokbokki (간장 떡볶이). Ganjang means soy sauce in English.

How to make Gungjung Tteokbokki (Korean royal court rice cakes) | MyKoreanKitchen.com

The dish typically includes white rice cakes, some meat (mostly beef) and various colourful vegetables. So it looks and tastes more luxurious than typical Tteokbokki.

The taste is slightly salty and savoury. It is one of my daughter’s favourite dishes. She’s only little, but she can easily carve out half of these rice cakes and mushrooms. Between my meat loving husband and my daughter, I typically end up with bell peppers and onions. Lol. 😉 I hope you enjoy it too!

Gungjung Tteokbokki (Korean royal court rice cakes) recipe. This is a non-spicy Korean rice cake recipe. Stir fried with soy sauce, beef and vegetables. | MyKoreanKitchen.com

Ingredients for 2 servings

Gungjung Tteokbokki (Korean Royal Court Rice Cakes) Ingredients | MyKoreanKitchen.com

Main

  • 300g/0.7 pounds Korean rice cakes, separated (Unless the rice cakes are fresh and soft, soak them in warm water for 10 to 15 mins or parboil in boiling water for 30 seconds)
  • 100g/3.5 ounces rib eye fillet, thinly sliced
  • 100g/3.5 ounces shiitake mushrooms, stems removed and thinly sliced
  • 1/2 small onion (50g/1.8 ounces), julienned
  • 1/4 red bell pepper (40g/1.4 ounces), julienned
  • 1/4 yellow bell pepper (40g/ 1.4 ounces), julienned
  • 1/4 green bell pepper (40g/ 1.4 ounces), julienned
  • Some cooking oil (I used rice bran oil)
  • (Optional) 1 stalk of green onion (15g/0.5 ounces), thinly sliced
  • (Optional) 1 tsp roasted sesame seeds

Beef marinade (Mix these well in a bowl)

Seasoning Sauce (Mix these well in a bowl)

  • 1 and 1/2 Tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 tsp brown sugar
  • 1/2 tsp sesame oil
  • 1/4 tsp minced garlic

*1 Tbsp = 15 ml

**If you want to learn more about Korean cooking ingredients, check my 30 essential Korean cooking ingredients.

Steps

1.Combine the meat with the marinade. Set aside while other ingredients are being prepared.

2. In a heated pan (on medium-high heat), add some cooking oil and the onion. Stir lightly until they are wilted. Add the meat and cook briefly (about 30 seconds) until the outer layer is cooked.

Cooking process of Gungjung Tteokbokki (Korean Royal Court Rice Cakes) 1

3. Add the mushrooms, rice cakes, bell peppers and the seasoning sauce. Stir them well until all are cooked (about 2 to 3 mins).

Cooking process of Gungjung Tteokbokki (Korean Royal Court Rice Cakes) 2

4. Garnish with the green onion and roasted sesame seeds. Serve.

Gungjung Tteokbokki (Korean royal court rice cakes). It is also known as soy sauce Tteokbokki. | MyKoreanKitchen.com

Update: This post was originally posted in October 2006 and it is now updated with clearer instructions and better photographs.


Gungjung Tteokbokki (Korean Royal Court Rice Cakes) | MyKoreanKitchen.com

Royal Rice Cake (Gungjung Tteokbbokki)

Gungjung Tteokbokki is one of Korean royal court cuisine originated from the royal palace in the Joseon dynasty. It is known as king's snack. Unlike to typical Tteokbokki (Korean spicy rice cakes), Gungjung Tteokbokki is not spicy but rather savoury.
5 from 3 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: Snacks
Cuisine: Korean
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes
Servings: 2
Calories: 306kcal
Author: Sue | My Korean Kitchen

Ingredients

MAIN

  • 300 g Korean rice cakes (0.7 pounds), separated (Unless the rice cakes are fresh and soft, soak them in warm water for 10 to 15 mins or parboil in boiling water for 30 seconds)
  • 100 g rib eye fillet (3.5 ounces), thinly sliced
  • 100 g shiitake mushrooms (3.5 ounces), stems removed and thinly sliced
  • 1/2 small onion (50 g / 1.8 ounces), julienned
  • 1/4 red bell pepper (40 g / 1.4 ounces), julienned
  • 1/4 yellow bell pepper (40 g / 1.4 ounces), julienned
  • 1/4 green bell pepper (40 g / 1.4 ounces), julienned
  • Some cooking oil , I used rice bran oil
  • 1 stalk green onion (15 g / 0.5 ounces), thinly sliced, optional
  • 1 tsp toasted sesame seeds , optional

BEEF MARINADE (MIX THESE WELL IN A BOWL)

SEASONING SAUCE (MIX THESE WELL IN A BOWL)

Instructions

  • Combine the meat with the marinade. Set aside while other ingredients are being prepared.
  • In a heated pan (on medium-high heat), add some cooking oil and the onion. Stir lightly until they are wilted. Add the meat and cook briefly (about 30 seconds) until the outer layer is cooked.
  • Add the mushrooms, rice cakes, bell peppers and the seasoning sauce. Stir them well until all are cooked (about 2 to 3 mins).
  • Garnish with the green onion and roasted sesame seeds. Serve.

Nutrition

Calories: 306kcal | Carbohydrates: 35g | Protein: 16g | Fat: 11g | Saturated Fat: 3g | Cholesterol: 30mg | Sodium: 1300mg | Potassium: 462mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 5g | Vitamin A: 610IU | Vitamin C: 61.4mg | Calcium: 16mg | Iron: 1.7mg
Tried this recipe?I love hearing how you went with my recipes! Leave a comment below or Tag me on Instagram @MyKoreanKitchen.

 

You May Also Like

Written by: Sue

Last Updated: May 13, 2019

Hi, I'm Sue and I am the creator of My Korean Kitchen. Thank you for joining me in this delicious culinary journey!

Leave a Comment

22 thoughts on “Gungjung Tteokbokki (Korean Royal Court Rice Cakes)”

  1. I hadn’t made this in awhile, but this time I added a bunch of random stuff (so I guess besides my kitchen-sink japchae I now make kitchen sink gungjung tteokbokki…?). I don’t like onions or bell peppers so my ingredients were the tteokbokki (of course), beef, shiitake, wood ear mushrooms, enoki mushrooms, carrots, green onions, garlic chives, ginko nuts, and some of the Korean pickled yellow radish (what is the name of this by the way? I threw the package away so I can’t go read it ^<__<^;; ). I stirfried all the veggies (and the enoki) separately from the meat, tteokbokki, and other mushrooms and omg it smelled so delicious, even my mum agreed (and she generally can't stand my cooking).

    You know, ever since I discovered your blog I think Korean food is now the cuisine that I cook the most often, so thanks so much for introducing me to my new favourite foods. ^^

    • Seriously, that’s a lot of random stuff. 😉 Korean yellow pickled radish is called danmuji (단무지). Glad to hear you’re cooking lots of Korean food!

  2. Hi Sue, Looking forward to trying this recipe out for sure! I’ve only cooked with rice cake twice and loved the texture.

  3. Oh my God this is the best. Slightly salty and savory? I am in. So easy to make. I love Sesame seeds. It adds a taste and aroma that is out of this World. Sue the photography is just so amazing, Makes you want to make it right now.

  4. …. thanks for this site… i was able to find the rice cake recipe and tried it myself …really tasted good!

  5. Hi Sue,

    I know that this is a late reply. But I made this recipe yesterday nite and I quite enjoyed it. For spice, I added the Korean spicy sauce that comes in the red container. Oh goodness! I love your site and how easy the recipes are. I love the pictures too.

    Thank you for your wonderful recipe!

  6. Hi, tellos
    It is possible to make rice cake yourself, but it is going to take a bit of your effort.

    You need non-glutinous rice and some salt and need to pound them finely. (Unless you have powdered rice.) Then add some water, rub it up then steam it. Then beat the dough with a heavy bat and roll it with your hand, then it is done. (This is just the basic rough guide)

    I think it is better that you go to a Korean restaurant in your town, and ask where to get those Korean ingredients.

  7. hello again, just wondering if it is possible to make rice cake by myself???…because i think i won’t be abble to find any in switzerland..

Leave a Comment

NEVER MISS A NEW RECIPE

Join 15,000+ other Korean food lovers! Get the latest recipes from

My Korean Kitchen delivered to your email inbox. It's free!