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Quick Pickled Radishes

Try these Korean style quick pickled radishes. They are super easy to make and will accompany your favorite Korean fried chicken really well. It’s perfectly sweet, tangy and delicious!

Pickled radishes in a jar and a small bowl

What is Pickled Radishes

Korean pickled radishes are a popular side dish to Korean fried chicken, so they are known as chicken mu (치킨무). Mu means radish in Korean.

Not only are they are delicious, they are crunchy, addictive and refreshing as well. 

You can make pickled radishes using Korean radish or daikon radish. However, if you have trouble finding these varieties, you can use more common types like pink or red radishes instead. Although I find that Korean or daikon radish results in a crunchier texture.

To make the pickled radishes, you first cut the radish into small cubes then pickle them in sweet and tangy pickling brine. You leave it at room temperature for a few hours then refrigerate until the radish develops a nice sweet and tangy taste.

 

How to Serve Pickled Radishes

As I mentioned above, these pickled radishes are best served with Korean fried chicken, however it will accompany any deep fried dishes well.

In particular, the sweet and tanginess of the pickled radishes will help reduce the oily taste of deep fried dishes. 

It will also go well with spicy Korean food (e.g. dakgalbi) and other Korean BBQ dishes.

 

More Korean Pickle Recipes

If you love pickles, you’ve got to try these Korean pickle recipes. They’re so delicious and addictive!

 

Ingredients for Picked Radishes

  • 500g / 17 ounces Korean radish or daikon radish, peeled and ends trimmed
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/2 cup white sugar
  • 1/2 cup white vinegar
  • 1 tsp coarse sea salt 

* 1 Cup = 250 ml

** Above ingredients will require 2 x 490ml preserving jar or 1 x 1 L jar. Be sure to sterilize the jar beforehand.

 

How to Make Picked Radishes

1. Cut the radish into small cubes (about 2.5 cm / 1 inch) and put them into a sterilized glass jar.

cubed daikon radishes on a wooden cutting board

2. Combine water, sugar, vinegar and salt in a sauce pan and bring them to boil over low to medium low heat until the sugar dissolves (about 2-3 mins). Stir often.

boiling pickling brine on induction stove

3. Pour the brine over the radish and close the lid. Leave at room temperature for 3-4 hours then refrigerate. It should be ready to eat in 1 – 2 days.

Pickled radishes in canning jars

4. Serve with your favorite main meal. (e.g. Korean fried chicken). It can be refrigerated in an air tight container for a few weeks.

Pickled radishes in a jar with a spoon

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Pickled radishes in a jar with a spoon

Quick Pickled Radishes

Perfectly sweet, tangy and delicious pickled radish recipe.
5 from 1 vote
Print Pin Rate
Course: Side dishes
Cuisine: Korean
Keyword: pickled radish, pickled radishes, quick pickled radishes
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 3 minutes
Total Time: 8 minutes
Servings: 30
Calories: 17kcal
Author: Sue

Ingredients

  • 500 g korean radish or daikon radish (17 ounces), peeled and ends trimmed
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/2 cup white sugar
  • 1/2 cup white vinegar
  • 1 tsp sea salt , coarse

Instructions

  • Cut the radish into small cubes (about 2.5 cm / 1 inch) and put them into a sterilized glass jar.
  • Combine water, sugar, vinegar and salt in a sauce pan and bring them to boil over low to medium low heat until the sugar dissolves (about 2-3 mins). Stir often.
  • Pour the brine over the radish and close the lid. Leave at room temperature for 3-4 hours then refrigerate. It should be ready to eat in 1 – 2 days.
  • Serve with your favorite main meal. (e.g. Korean fried chicken). It can be refrigerated in an air tight container for a few weeks.

Notes

  • If you have trouble finding Korean or daikon radish, you can use more common types like pink or red radishes instead. Although I find that Korean or daikon radish results in a crunchier texture.
  • 1 Cup = 250 ml
  • Above ingredients will require 2 x 490ml preserving jar or 1 x 1 L jar. Be sure to sterilize the jar beforehand.

Nutrition

Calories: 17kcal | Carbohydrates: 4g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 1g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 82mg | Potassium: 38mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 4g | Vitamin C: 4mg | Calcium: 5mg | Iron: 1mg

The nutrition information shown is an estimate provided by an online nutrition calculator. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist’s advice.

Tried this recipe?I love hearing how you went with my recipes! Rate this recipe with a comment below and tag me on Instagram @MyKoreanKitchen.

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Written by: Sue

Last Updated: September 12, 2020
Sue and My Korean Kitchen Profile

Welcome to my Korean kitchen! I’m so happy that you're here. I am Sue, the creator behind My Korean Kitchen (since 2006). I love good food and simplifying recipes. Here you will find my best and family approved recipes. Thanks for stopping by!

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7 thoughts on “Quick Pickled Radishes”

  1. When I make Mu with daikon, they give off foul odor in the refrigerator. How to avoid this? Salt and rest for 30-45 minutes and rinse?

    Reply
        • That’s a very good question!

          I was initially going to say that the brine mixture is only lukewarm. Then I decided look up the definition of lukewarm on the internet to be sure that I’m saying the right thing.

          One source I read at the time said, water is lukewarm if it’s around or just slightly higher than 100F / 37.8C. The mixture I made results in 95F / 35C. (Remember that it’s only boiled at low temperature for a short time. Also, it cools down fast even though you don’t intend to cool it down.) So I said that the brine mixture is not even lukewarm.

          That being said there are other references that will give slightly different temperature range for lukewarm as well. Maybe it’s worth reading this article if you want to know more. https://www.thespruceeats.com/how-hot-is-lukewarm-water-1706102

          Bottomline, if you don’t feel safe, you are welcome to cool the brine down before pouring it into the jar.

          Hope this helps.

          Reply
  2. Looks delicious and I’m going to try this with daikon (called mooli in UK) asap! Only question I have what is the % rate of vinegar assumed?

    Reply

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