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Korean Style Pink Radish Pickles

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How to make Korean style radish pickles using pink radish. It’s simple, easy and moreish! 

How to make Korean style radish pickles using pink radish. It's simple, easy and moreish! It will accompany well with Korean fried chicken and Korean BBQ! | MyKoreanKitchen.com

Korean Style Pink Radish Pickles (한국식 분홍무 절임)

Do you like radish pickles? I love them! It’s such a gem dish. I particularly love pairing them with Samgyeopsal (Korean pork belly) BBQ meat and also with Bibim Naengmyeon (Korean spicy cold noodles). I have also tried these with Bibimbap, and KFC (Korean Fried Chicken) too!

I don’t know much about wine or cheese, but I think it’s equivalent to pairing chardonnay with camembert cheese. It adds delicately pleasant sweet and sourness and crunchy texture to my favorite Korean dishes above and I simply can’t have enough of them each time!

What is Korean Style Radish Pickles?

Typically a daikon (white) radish is used for Korean radish pickles; however, it’s often hard to find daikon radish where I live. So I decided to make some pink radish pickles, since they are easier to find.

By now, you might be wondering, what’s “Korean style” about these radish pickles? Truth be told, there’s nothing particularly Korean about my radish pickles regarding the ingredients used (there’s no gochujang or gochugaru involved!) or the method of cooking.

However, it does have the same sweet and sour taste that I’m familiar with, and it also goes well with other Korean dishes I mentioned above. 

Though, I’m also going to present to you a daikon (white) radish pickles recipe in the near future. So stay tuned!

Essentially though, I would use the same vinegar mixture as with my pink radish pickles and they should give the same taste as with the pink radish pickles, except that each pickle slice is bigger.

I hope you get to try this recipe soon!

Ingredients

  • 500g (1.1 pounds) pink radishes
  • Vinegar mixture
    • 1 cup white vinegar or rice vinegar
    • 1 cup sugar, raw or white
    • 1 cup water
    • Pinch of fine sea salt

*1 Tbsp = 15 ml, 1 Cup = 250 ml

** You will need a sterile 1L glass jar.

How to Make Korean Style Pink Radish Pickles

1. Rinse the radishes in cold water and clean/ trim the root and stems.

Pink Radish
2. Thinly slice the radish bulb and set aside.

Pink Radish Sliced
3. Make the vinegar mixture in a small sauce pan by mixing them all and bring it to boil on low heat until the sugar dissolves (about 3- 4 mins). Whisk it occasionally to promote the dissolving process.

Vinegar Mixture for Pickle
4. Put the sliced radishes in a sterile glass jar and pour in the vinegar mixture. Let the jar cool down and close the lid. (Though it’s only lukewarm, so you won’t have to wait long.) Leave at room temperature for a few hours then refrigerate. 

Pink Radish in a jar
5. Serve with your choice of main dishes (e.g. Korean BBQ, Korean Fried Chicken etc). (Tips. I found that the pickles taste better after 48 hours. While they will keep well in the fridge for several weeks, it tastes best in the first 7 days, with still a good taste and the crunchy texture.)

Samgyeopsal BBQ with Radish Pickles
2 days old radish pickles with Samgyeopsal (Korean pork belly) BBQ

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Korean-Style-Pink-Radish-Pickles

Korean Style Pink Radish Pickles

Korean Style Pink Radish Pickle Recipe
5 from 15 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: Side dishes
Cuisine: Korean
Keyword: pickled radish, pink radish pickles, radish pickles
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 10 minutes
Servings: 10
Calories: 92kcal
Author: Sue | My Korean Kitchen

Ingredients

  • 500 g pink radishes (1.1 pounds)

Vinegar mixture

  • 1 cup white vinegar or rice vinegar
  • 1 cup sugar raw or white
  • 1 cup water
  • Pinch of fine sea salt

Instructions

  • Rinse the radishes in cold water and clean / trim the root and stems.
  • Thinly slice the radish bulb and set aside.
  • Make the vinegar mixture in a small sauce pan by mixing them all and bring it to boil on low heat until the sugar dissolves (about 3- 4 mins). Whisk it occasionally to promote the dissolving process.
  • Put the sliced radish in a sterile glass jar and pour in the vinegar mixture. Let the jar cool down and close the lid. (Though it’s only lukewarm, so you won’t have to wait long.) Leave at room temperature for a few hours then refrigerate.
  • Serve with your choice of main dishes (e.g. Korean BBQ, Korean Fried Chicken etc). (Tips. I found that the pickles taste better after 48 hours. While they will keep well in the fridge for several weeks, it tastes best in the first 7 days, with still a good taste and the crunchy texture.)

Notes

* 1 Tbsp = 15 ml, 1 Cup = 250 ml
** You will need a sterile 1L glass jar.

Nutrition

Calories: 92kcal | Carbohydrates: 21g | Sodium: 21mg | Potassium: 122mg | Sugar: 20g | Vitamin C: 7.4mg | Calcium: 16mg | Iron: 0.3mg

The nutrition information shown is an estimate provided by an online nutrition calculator. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist’s advice.

Tried this recipe?I love hearing how you went with my recipes! Rate this recipe with a comment below and tag me on Instagram @MyKoreanKitchen.

 

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Written by: Sue

Last Updated: May 24, 2020
Sue and My Korean Kitchen Profile

Welcome to my Korean kitchen! I’m so happy that you're here. I am Sue, the creator behind My Korean Kitchen (since 2006). I love good food and simplifying recipes. Here you will find my best and family approved recipes. Thanks for stopping by!

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33 thoughts on “Korean Style Pink Radish Pickles”

  1. DELISH!! Made my my second batch with the last of the season radishes from the garden. We love these, I use in salads, eat out of the jar and just tried on BBQ wings for the football game. They are so good, this jar is gong to my son who came over and found in my fridge. He asked me to make a batch to take home….YES!

    Reply
  2. My family loves these! They make a great snack all on there own or in Poke bowls! Thanks for sharing your recipe. This is the second time if have made them in a year. The last batch lasted 6 months in the fridge.

    Reply
  3. Great recipe. I had some chicken salad and stuffed it into mini bell peppers. I topped that with a slice of these and everyone raved about it 😉

    Reply
  4. Hi Sue!
    I have a question about this recipe: Are they very sweet? can I use less sugar?
    Thanks!!
    C
    OH, ps, do you have a good recipe for Pajeon?

    Reply
  5. I’ve been looking for a recipe like since I came back from South Korea. I tried it while I was eating Korean BBQ, and it was so amazing!! I’m so glad I came across this and now I can make them all the time!! Talk about a new favorite snack.

    Reply
    • Raw sugar is less processed sugar. Some says it’s the most natural sugar. It has slight brown / beige color to it. You can use white sugar instead but I typically use raw sugar in my cooking unless the color matters. 🙂

      Reply
    • Hi Olivier, a great question! The pickles will keep well in the fridge for several weeks. But they are in their most fresh and crisp state for about 4 to 5 days after pickling. Hope this clears up. 🙂

      Reply
    • I think you can find these radishes in winter season reasonably easily here in Brisbane. Anyway, it’s definitely prettier with pink radish pickles! 🙂

      Reply
  6. Sue,
    After the vinegar mixture is boiled, should we wait a bit for it to cool down before pouring it on top of the radishes which are in the jar, or just remove the boiling mixture fro the stove top and pour it into the radish containing jar?

    Reply
    • Hi Jerry, I added the mixture soon after boiling it. Because it was boiled over low heat only until the sugar dissolved (3-4 mins), the vinegar mixture wasn’t hot. It was not even lukewarm. Also the glass jar seemed ok for the heat introduced by the mixture. However, I see your point. it doesn’t hurt to pay extra safety caution. Thanks!

      Reply
  7. I love pickles and actually I think I made something similar from a Japanese recipe last year. I made it also with pink radish instead of the slightly bigger white (not daikon which luckily is easy to get here). I know I come late… but congratulations on your baby girl once more!!!

    Reply

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