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Rabokki – Ramen + Tteokbokki

A popular Korean snack meal – Rabokki recipe! Rabokki is all about spicy rice cakes and ramen noodles. It’s spicy, super delicious and addictive. Let’s cook it together!
 
Rabokki - Instant Ramen Noodles + Tteokbokki (Korean spicy rice cakes) | MyKoreanKitchen.com

What is Rabokki

Rabokki (라볶이) is a Korean portmanteau for Ramyeon (라면, instant ramen noodles) and Tteokbokki (떡볶이, Korean spicy rice cakes). It is a popular dish to many Koreans, particularly amongst teenagers. It gives spicy, delicious and addictive flavor and is quite a filling food at a relatively cheap price. Probably that’s why it is popular.

I also prefer rabokki over tteokbokki as it often includes more interesting and delicious additional ingredients such as boiled eggs, ramen noodles, dumplings and so on, which aren’t normally added in tteokbokki.

Rabokki - Ramen + Tteokbokki | MyKoreanKitchen.com

What’s in Rabokki?

The standard ingredients that go into rabokki are Korean rice cakes, ramen noodles, Korean fish cakes, cabbage leaves, spicy gochujang sauce and hard boiled eggs (to top it up).

But some people add Korean instant dumplings and deep fried seaweed spring rolls as well, and they go wonderfully together!

Also, some people might choose to add chewy noodles (jjolmyeon, 쫄면) instead of ramen noodles. Some people even add Korean ramen seasoning powder in addition to the spicy gochujang sauce.

Another ingredient you could add is sliced cheese. I forgot to add it this time, but I try to add it if I can.

Anyway, try this soon! You will love it.

Rabokki - Ramen + Tteokbokki (Korean spicy rice cakes) | MyKoreanKitchen.com

Ingredients for Rabokki (2 to 3 servings, as a main meal)

Rabokki ingredients

Main

  • 1 instant ramen noodle pack
  • Fresh Korean rice cakes 16 pieces (180g/6.3 ounces), separated, if you use pre-packaged or frozen rice cakes, separate them first then soak in warm water for 10 minutes before you use them.
  • 2 sheets (110g / 3.9 ounces) of Korean fish cakes, rinsed under hot running water for 1 min, chopped into small rectangular pieces
  • cabbage leaves (80g/2.8 ounces), chopped into small pieces
  • 1/2 small onion (60g/2.1 ounces), thinly sliced
  • 4 deep fried seaweed spring rolls (100g/3.5 ounces) – I bought them from a Korean grocery store (freezer section) but you can make them if you have the time.
  • 2 instant Korean dumplings (45g/1.6 ounces)
  • 2 hard boiled eggs, cut into halves

Broth

Sauce (Mix them well in a bowl)

  • 4 Tbsp gochujang (Korean chili paste)
  • 1 and 1/2 Tbsp raw sugar
  • 1 tsp minced garlic
  • 1 tsp gochugaru (Korean chili flakes)

Garnish

  • 1 stalk of green onion (20g/0.7 ounces), thinly chopped
  • some roasted sesame seeds

*1 Tbsp = 15 ml, 1 cup = 250 ml

** If you want to learn more about Korean cooking ingredients, check my 30 essential Korean cooking ingredients list!

How to Make Rabokki

1. Put the water (3 cups) in a medium pot and add the dried kelp and anchovies. Boil it for 10 mins uncovered on medium heat. Take out (& discard) the kelp and continue boiling for a further 10 mins. Take out the anchovy. Sieve through the boiled broth over damp cheese/linen cloth to remove small particles from the kelp and anchovies. (If you don’t mind these particles, you can skip sieving.) This should result in about 400ml of broth. (Check here if you need step by step photo instructions for this process.)

2. Pour the broth into a wider pot, add the sauce and stir it well. Boil it over medium high heat. (I used a shallow pot and portable gas burner to enjoy Rabokki like a hot pot dish at the table.)

Rabokki sauce boiling

3. Once the broth starts to boil, reduce the heat to medium low. Add the rest of the ingredients and as they cook, stir around occasionally.

Rabokki cooking

4. (If you’re cooking at the table) Add the garnish ingredients and start eating them as they get ready. Otherwise, serve when everything is cooked. Add the garnish ingredients just before serving.

Rabokki - Ramen + Tteokbokki | MyKoreanKitchen.com

Note

  • If you want to eat Rabokki more spicier, then adjust the sauce ratio by reducing gochujang (Korean chilli paste) and increasing gochugaru (Korean chili flakes).

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Rabokki - Instant Ramen Noodles + Tteokbokki (Korean spicy rice cakes) | MyKoreanKitchen.com

Rabokki - Ramen + Tteokbokki

One Pot Ramen & Tteokbokki = Korean Rabokki recipe!
4.84 from 12 votes
Print Pin Rate Save
Course: Snacks
Cuisine: Korean
Keyword: rabokki
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 35 minutes
Servings: 2 to 3
Calories: 478kcal
Author: Sue | My Korean Kitchen

Ingredients

Main

  • 1 instant ramen noodle
  • 16 pieces Korean rice cakes (180 g / 6.3 ounces), separated, if you use pre-packaged rice cakes, separate them first then soak in warm water for 10 minutes before you use them.
  • 2 sheets Korean fish cakes (110 g / 3.9 ounces), rinsed under hot running water for 1 min, chopped into small rectangular pieces
  • 80 g cabbage leaves (2.8 ounces), chopped into small pieces
  • 1/2 small onion (60 g / 2.1 ounces), thinly sliced,
  • 4 deep fried seaweed spring rolls (100 g / 3.5 ounces), I bought them from a Korean grocery store (freezer section) but you can make them if you have the time.
  • 2 frozen Korean dumplings (45 g / 1.6 ounces)
  • 2 hard boiled eggs , cut into halves

Broth

  • 3 cups water
  • 5 g dried kelp (0.2 ounces)
  • 15 g dried anchovy (0.5 ounces), head and black innards removed

Sauce (Mix them well in a bowl.)

  • 4 Tbsp gochujang Korean chilli paste
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp raw sugar
  • 1 tsp minced garlic
  • 1 tsp gochugaru Korean chilli flakes

Garnish

Instructions

  • Put the water (3 cups) in a medium pot and add the dried kelp and anchovies. Boil it for 10 mins uncovered on medium heat. Take out (& discard) the kelp and continue boiling for a further 10 mins. Take out the anchovy. Sieve through the boiled broth over damp cheese/linen cloth to remove small particles from the kelp and anchovies. (If you don’t mind these particles, you can skip sieving.) This should result in about 400ml of broth. (Check here if you need step by step photo instructions for this process.)
  • Pour the broth into a wider pot, add the sauce and stir it well. Boil it over medium high heat. (I used a shallow pot and portable gas burner to enjoy Rabokki like a hot pot dish at the table.)
  • Once the broth starts to boil, reduce the heat to medium low. Add the rest of ingredients and as they cook, stir around occasionally.
  • (If you're cooking at the table) Add the garnish ingredients and start eating them as they get ready. Otherwise, serve when everything is cooked. Add the garnish ingredients just before serving.

Notes

1 Tbsp = 15 ml, 1 cup = 250 ml

Nutrition Info (per serving)

Calories: 478kcal | Carbohydrates: 76g | Protein: 18g | Fat: 10g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Cholesterol: 201mg | Sodium: 733mg | Potassium: 341mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 16g | Vitamin A: 910IU | Vitamin C: 12.8mg | Calcium: 82mg | Iron: 2.1mg

The nutrition information shown is an estimate provided by an online nutrition calculator. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist’s advice.

Tried this recipe?I love hearing how you went with my recipes! Rate this recipe with a comment below and tag me on Instagram @MyKoreanKitchen.

 

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Filed under: My Recipes, Snacks

Written by: Sue

Last Updated:

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Welcome to my Korean kitchen! I’m so happy that you're here. I am Sue, the creator behind My Korean Kitchen (since 2006). I love good food and simplifying recipes. Here you will find my best and family approved recipes. Thanks for stopping by!

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50 thoughts on “Rabokki – Ramen + Tteokbokki”

  1. good recipe, i think i would subtract at least half a tbsp of gochujang next time, 4tbsp let to a sauce was a little too thick and gritty for my taste. used 4 jalapeno slices and it was great- thanks!

    Reply
    • Hi! What else can I use to make the broth if I can’t find dry kelp and anchovies? And what can I change the fish cakes with, I can’t find them either at the Asian market. Thank you!

      Reply
  2. I tried making this today and it’s a success. I bought a pre-packed soft ttobokki kit which has the basics ingredients (fishcakes, ricecakes, sauce and fried seaweed rolls). Then made my own dashi stock. I added the ramyun seasoning powder and a little water when the sauce dried out to cook it a little bit longer and it turned out well!

    Reply
  3. Great recipe! I followed the recipe with one change – I cut the sugar in half – and it was still very tasty. This recipe is a keeper! 😋

    Reply
  4. Hi thanks for the recipe,
    would like to try this next weekend.
    One question, can I replace the dried anchovy with the anchovy powder?
    How much should I use the powder?
    Thanks!!

    Reply
    • You can certainly try it. I’m not certain about the quantity though as I haven’t tested it myself. But I would start with 1-2 tsp of anchovy powder and possibly adjust the amount in the follow round of cooking. Good luck! 🙂

      Reply
  5. I would love to make it, but personnaly hate all things fishy …
    Is it possible to make it without the anchovy broth and just use the MSG (I know it makes me an extremely bad korean cook haha)?

    Reply
    • You can reduce gochujang (Korean chili paste) and/or gochugaru (Korean chili flakes) to make it less spicy. But for this recipe, I’d start with gochujang first since it’s used a lot more than gochugaru.

      Reply
  6. Hi there – been loving your recipes! I am making this today – but it is unclear to me if I should add the “soup base” and “vegetable mix” packets that come with the Shin Ramyun pack to the recipe. Can you please clarify? Thank you!

    Reply
  7. I bought frozen rice cakes few months ago and didn’t have the time to do it until today. I got the rice cakes which was sitting in my freezer for quite a while now since I decided to make rabokki today. But then I saw the expiration date 2017.7.28 which means July 28, 2017. It’s already August 21, 2017 and it’s almost a month since it ‘expired’. I feel so bad. Can’t I use it anymore? Pls help me! Hoping for your reply asap. Thankyou so much!

    Reply
    • Hi Chloe, I wouldn’t use that expired rice cakes. I know it’s been frozen for the whole time, so it could be OK to eat (at your own risk). But I know from my experience that the texture of old frozen rice cakes are not very good. Not worth cooking with in my opinion. Hope this helps! 🙂

      Reply
  8. Oh my God this looks so good. I am so hungry now. I was in Korea last year and even at the airport they have really Korean food. Need to visit the Korean store to get the chili paste and other stuff.

    Reply
  9. I’m new to your website, but am impressed. I live in NYC now so will be able to purchase ingredients. This Irish/English heritage 51 year old lived in Hawaii and Los Angeles for a few years, and happily first had Korean food in the 80s. It’s seriously delicious. My son grew up eating Korean food at least once every other month at a Korean restaurant in Augusta, GA we frequented. When he was six years old, he gave his order for spicy squid to a new waitress, who didn’t know us yet. The lovely Korean waitress responded, “No, no, little white boy, will be too spicy.” We allayed her fears, spicy squid was served to him and he was very happy!

    Reply
  10. i made rabbokki!!!!!!!!! god im so happy! im in china and craving fo korean food. when i found gochujang in the supermarket, i swore to god i will make bibimbap and rabbokki! thanks for the wonderful recipe. although it turned out to be very sweet, i will work on that next time~

    Reply
  11. Hi Sue,

    I am a huge fan of your web-site!!! Everything that I have cooked following your recipes have worked out beautifully. We have a Korean student staying with us at the moment and I followed your recipe for Rabokki. He was so happy with our dinner. He made a comment that it was exactly like the restaurants in Korea. Exactly!! Wow what a compliment!!! Thank you for sharing your wonderful recipes.

    Kindest Regards
    Donna

    Reply
  12. Ohmigosh, I’ve been looking for this recipe everywhere. I have been craving it for 7 years and haven’t found it in the states! Thanks so much for posting it. I live in a small town with no Asian food stores nearby. Do you know of any store that sells the rice cakes (Garaeddeok) online? Oh I hope so!! If you know of any I’d be forever grateful! Otherwise do you have a recipe so I can make them myself? Thanks!

    Reply
  13. awesome recipe
    i keep using it again and again
    i cant find fish cake sheets here in bermuda
    but its still good
    i tried it with cilantro today
    it tastes SO good and fresh

    Reply
    • Wow, I didn’t know I had a visitor from Bermuda.
      Very glad to hear that you enjoyed the dish so much!! Sorry to hear that fish cakes aren’t available there though.

      Reply
  14. Hello, I am Jeong-Ah Lee and Korean.

    Glad to hear all of you have enjoyed Rabbokki though you people are not getting used to eating spicy food.

    Depends on sauce, you can have Rabbokki with lesser spicy, salty or sweet..It’s up to individuals..Sometimes, I feel that Rabbokki being sold at street is too sweet and salty, but not spicy ^^. Those are not good for health.

    You can put several boiled eggs-of course after shell off-when you cook Rabbokki. You feel getting better to have the boiled egg yolk instead of drinking water when you feel really hot..

    Hope everyone has wonderful time with your friends..
    Jeong Ah

    Reply
  15. I’ve been craving to try this since I saw it and finally today I went to the store and found rice cake! I made this dish for the first time and it was delicious! Great recipe! My roommate came sniffing around and he only does that when he smells something he really thinks smells good – he then had a huge serving! Proof this is a great dish : D

    Reply
  16. Dear sue,

    Thank you for this recipe – I will be sure to try it next week, after I go back to the Korean store, kukje. I actually bought it ready made and it was so delicious, so I will try to make it myself next week.

    Reply
  17. Merci for your recipe! I’ll try to impress my gf next time 🙂 By the way, what Korean word do you mean by “fish cake”?
    All the best from Germany!

    Reply
  18. loved this recipe! I was 2 tbsp of the “gold” teh yang gochujang and 2 tbsp of the “meh oon(spicy)” teh yang gochujang. i didn’t have any noodles on hand, so i didn’t add them. recipe was great though! just the right amount of sweetness and spice!

    here are two pictures of the dish i made! will be making again soon!

    http://farm1.static.flickr.com/194/460463060_7113c02731.jpg?v=0

    http://farm1.static.flickr.com/235/460463052_59e5fb6ac8.jpg?v=0

    my lovely roommates enjoying the meal! we also had curry and rice. . a BIG feast it was!

    http://farm1.static.flickr.com/240/460463062_25fd3e1ee6.jpg?v=0

    thanks again!

    Reply
  19. I just try to cooking Rabokki with the recipe it was simply awesome! Thanks for the great recipe..
    I simply like the dish, i tasted it a few times in the Korean Restaurant and always had a craving for this dish..
    I cook it with the frozen rice cakes, but i think it turned out really well!It was amazing, all my friends love the rabokki..

    Reply
  20. Kat, I always thought only teenagers have pimples, but I continually have pimples after giving myself some sweet treats. 🙂

    tigerfish, I think due to the sweetness, it wasn’t that spicy. I say low to medium? But don’t listen to my opinion about spiciness. Koreans love spicy food. 😀

    Christina, I sometimes use prepackaged ones when I couldn’t get fresh rice cakes, they are OK but fresh rice cakes are always the best. 🙂

    Reply
  21. ooh, I love rice cakes! But there’s only pre-packaged frozen ones available at where I live. I’m sure the fresh ones taste much better?!

    Reply

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