Delicious! Dak Galbi (Spicy Korean Chicken), Version 2

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Spicy Korean Chicken (Dak Galbi)
My favourite meal, Dak Galbi (닭갈비) is one of the most popular foods that people are searching for on this blog. I posted about it 4 months ago and have gained a good reputation. I have been busy cooking new dishes every day, so I haven’t had the chance to have my favourite meal for nearly three months now. So since Dakgalbi is so popular amongst you and me, I thought I will do another post about it, but give it a more decent taste and mouth watering pictures. How does that sound?
Spicy Korean Chicken (Dak Galbi) before cooking

Dak Galbi (Spicy Korean Chicken) ready to cook!

I was so thrilled to try this out again and very happy with the result I got. My “food critic” – my sister – thinks that it wasn’t as good as the one from Dak Galbi street in Chuncheon (춘천) where it originates from but she said that it was definitely tastier than some of our local restaurants. So I want you to try this out and tell me what you think of it. :)

  • Recommended equipment – Portable gas burner and double handled wok

Ingredients for 4 people

(Expected Prep time – 1 hour 15 minutes, Cooking time – 10 minutes)

-Meat and the first seasoning

  • Chicken breast 500 g (You can use a whole chicken or chicken thigh instead.)
  • Refined rice wine – 2 tbsp
  • Ginger powder – ¼ tsp
  • Pepper 3 sprinkles

-Marinade sauce (mix these well in a bowl.)

  • Gochujang – 3 tbsp
  • Minced garlic – 1 tbsp
  • Korean chili powder – 1 tbsp
  • Korean soy sauce – 1 tbsp
  • Dark brown sugar – 1 tbsp
  • Korean yellow curry powder – 1 tsp
  • ½ a grated onion

-Side ingredients

  • 1 medium size potato (using sweet potato is more authentic, though I forgot to buy one, so I added potato instead)
  • ⅓ of a medium carrot
  • ¼ of a small cabbage
  • 11 perilla leaves (so called sesame leaves, ggaennip)
  • Fresh rice cakes (Garaeddeok) 400g (It is a lot, but we love the rice cakes. If you are using pre packaged ones, soak them in cold water for 20 minutes before you use them.)

Prep

Delicious! Dakgalbi (Marinated Chicken in Spicy Sauce), The Version 2 prep
  1. Rinse the chicken in cold water and cut it into mouthful pieces. Put the chicken pieces into a bowl then add the first seasoning on top. Soak for about 15 minutes.
  2. While you are waiting, wash the vegetables, peel the skin off as needed.
  3. Thin slice the potato (or sweet potato), carrot, cabbage, and perilla leaves.
  4. Add the seasoning sauce into the chicken bowl, mix it well, and leave it for 1 hour.

Cooking

Delicious! Dakgalbi (Marinated Chicken in Spicy Sauce), The Version 2 cooking
  1. Pre-heat the wok for about 20 seconds and add some cooking oil in the wok.
  2. Put all the vegetables into the wok and add the meat on top. Cook them on medium high to high heat for about 10 mins or until well done. Stir them well while it is cooking.
  3. Serve and enjoy!
Dak Galbi - Korean spicy chicken

Enjoying Dak Galbi, the restaurant way at home

  • Start eating while Dak Galbi is still cooking. So you need to have a portable gas burner and double handled wok or nonstick pot on a dining table and cook the meat and vegetables in there. You can start eating vegetables and rice cakes first as they cook faster than the meat.
  • Prepare some lettuce and perilla leaves to wrap the cooked Dak Galbi.
  • When you are nearly finished the meal, you can add some udon noodles or rice and stir fry them. (I used rice for us – 1½ cups of steamed rice, some finely chopped Kimchi, a dash of sesame oil, some ripped seasoned laver – I didn’t add any sauce, but if you want you can add some gochujang.)
Delicious! Dakgalbi (Marinated Chicken in Spicy Sauce), The Version 2 after rice

Some questions you might ask

1) When do I need to add some noodles or rice?

– If you have little bits of vegetables and meat left in the wok at the end of the meal, then it is the time to add them. This is a picture of the right time. Michael insisted that I shouldn’t post this picture, because it doesn’t look as appetizing, but to make it clearer I am sharing it with you. :)

Delicious! Dakgalbi (Marinated Chicken in Spicy Sauce), The Version 2 after

2) Is 500 g chicken really enough for 4 people?

– Well, while I was eating Dak Galbi, I thought ‘I wish I had added more chicken’. Though since I added a lot of rice cakes, it was very filling for 4 people, but if you going to add less rice cakes than I did, then Do add more chicken.

3) Is it OK to use a portable electric burner?

– I am not that fond of electric burners in general. If it is the only burner available for you, then I guess you can, but I always prefer gas burners. They heat faster and are easier to control.

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5.0 from 3 reviews
Delicious! Dak Galbi (Marinated Chicken in Spicy Sauce), Version 2
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Main
Cuisine: Korean
Serves: 4
Ingredients
-Meat and the first seasoning
  • Chicken breast 500 g (You can use a whole chicken or chicken thigh instead.)
  • Refined rice wine – 2 tbsp
  • Ginger powder – ¼ tsp
  • Pepper 3 sprinkles
-Marinade sauce (mix these well in a bowl.)
  • Gochujang – 3 tbsp
  • Minced garlic – 1 tbsp
  • Korean chili powder – 1 tbsp
  • Korean soy sauce – 1 tbsp
  • Dark brown sugar – 1 tbsp
  • Korean yellow curry powder – 1 tsp
  • ½ a grated onion
-Side ingredients
  • 1 medium size potato (using sweet potato is more authentic, though I forgot to buy one, so I added potato instead)
  • ⅓ of a medium carrot
  • ¼ of a small cabbage
  • 11 perilla leaves (so called sesame leaves, ggaennip)
  • Fresh rice cakes (Garaeddeok) 400g (It is a lot, but we love the rice cakes. If you are using pre packaged ones, soak them in cold water for 20 minutes before you use them.)
Instructions
-Prep
  1. Rinse the chicken in cold water and cut it into mouthful pieces. Put the chicken pieces into a bowl then add the first seasoning on top. Soak for about 15 minutes.
  2. While you are waiting, wash the vegetables, peel the skin off as needed.
  3. Thin slice the potato (or sweet potato), carrot, cabbage, and perilla leaves.
  4. Add the seasoning sauce into the chicken bowl, mix it well, and leave it for 1 hour.
-Cooking
  1. Pre-heat the wok for about 20 seconds and add some cooking oil in the wok.
  2. Put all the vegetables into the wok and add the meat on top. Cook them on medium high to high heat for about 10 mins or until well done. Stir them well while it is cooking.
  3. Serve and enjoy!

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About Sue

Hi, I'm Sue and I am the author/cook/photographer behind My Korean Kitchen. Thank you for joining me in this delicious culinary journey!

Comments

  1. Jeremiah says:

    I lived in chuncheon for year and became addicted to this dish. Now living in Dubai and luckily was able to find all of the ingredients at a local korean market. This recipe is fantastic and as close to the dak galbi street version as i have had outside of that wonderful street. Great job Sue!

  2. It’s great I stumble upon your site, Im always vising my husband here in Seoul every Spring and Im afraid to eat korean dishes because of their spiciness… but now, Im starting to enjoy it, hot or not :) This weekend, well definitely try this :) Good job!! Now, I have a lot of food lined up :) Thanks! Cheers!

    • Hi Irene, I hope you get to try many Korean dishes from my blog. Korean food can be quite addictive, particularly this Dakgalbi! :) I hope you like it.

  3. I’m an American who spent 8 years in Seoul. I’ve had dakkalbi a million times in a million restaurants, and I have to say, after making your recipe, that it is absolutely among the best I’ve ever had. 5/5 stars!

  4. Why do you have to torture me ㅠ ㅠ I can’t find any of the essential Korean ingredients in Jordan and I am waiting for someone to maybe get them for me from the states. I hope I could get my hands on some Korean pastes soon. I have a question though what is the shelf life for mundo skins and Jjangmyeon noodles? because I want someone to buy them for me from the states when they travel. and if they got me tubs of black bean paste, Korean hot paste, and soybean paste how well do these ingredients travel?

    • I can almost feel your pain. :) Shelf life for mando skins and Jjangmyeon noodles, assuming they are dried (not refrigerated) should be ok for 6 month to 1 year, depending on the manufactured date.

      Black bean paste, Korean hot paste, and soybean paste, they should all travel well. They are very well packaged. Just make sure you can bring food into your country. Some country’s custom are quite restricted what they can bring in.

  5. Hi Sue~ I have linked your Dakgalbi recipe (one of my most favourite dishes) to my blog. Will be shared within a week. Warm Regards, Julia

    http://squeezecuddleshandmade.blogspot.com.au

  6. I was stationed at Cp Long in Wonju near the birthplace of this masterpiece. It’s still my favorite food of all time.

  7. Made this about two weeks ago – it was absolutely delicious! I am now addicted to it! It’s so versatile too! You can use it as a topping on pizza or as a filling in wraps… Soooo good! Thank you for sharing!

  8. Lawrence C Spencer says:

    How do I sign up for your website?

    Lawrence

  9. I’m not sure I understand the “I’ve read and re-read and nowhere do I mention Seasame oil. That would actually be quite rank.” comment. Why would that be quite rank (and I am asking only because I’m curious if there is a health concern I’m not aware of – not to be smart). My mother is Korean and we always use Sesame oil in our food when cooking. The Dakgalbi recipe my mother taught me is chicken marinated in soy sauce, sugar, sesame oil, garlic, green onion, onion, carrot, kochukaru, garlic, black pepper and gochuchang. To cook, you heat a large pan and then cook it all up as is. We never add oil to the pan (and it doesn’t stick) – but there is sesame oil in the marinade. You get a nice broth when it’s all cooked up that can be poured over your rice (like my dad prefers) or used to cook rice or noodles in as suggested above. As far as frying foods are concerned (like korean pancakes) my mom has always used Olive Oil. I’ve never heard of Evvo but I am curious about it now so I will search online to learn more about it. Thanks!

  10. Thank you for sharing your amazing recipe!!!!I’m a newbie cook and I don’t think I can ever make such great Korean food without your help!

  11. Just as a correction to Eric’s post, Korean cooks rarely use sesame oil anymore in their cooking. Evvo seems to be the prominent cooking oil for “health reasons” as Koreans are quite to adopt without thinking about the implications to Korean cooking. WTF. Whatever, but many Korean cook still put a teaspoon or so of sesame oil in at the very end or before serving, so there is that downhome Korean taste. Thank God.

    As for the chicken breast, I agree that actually you should purchase a whole chicken, hack it to pieces like a bad ex-boyfriend and marinade for an hour in the bloody mess of marinade you’ve just made.

    Also, Koreans (at least where I’m from) stir fry in batches, not altogether. (i.e. chapchae). So, if you have time, stir fry the the hard veggie bits first (sweet potatoes – purple ones needing double stir fry time), carrots, and potatoes).

    Finally, the whole concoction of veggies should cool a little b/c if you add cold chicken to a hot pan and hot veggies, your chicken will end up with a hard, dry foam-like texture rather than chewy, moist pieces.

    Yeah, that’s it.

    • Just as a correction to Jenny’s correction of Eric’s post. I’ve read and re-read and nowhere do I mention Seasame oil. That would actually be quite rank. I said Soy bean oil or Canolla oil, I’ve been in Korea for 9 years and DKB is my main meal. Now if you want to be healthier and not get that lingering olive oil taste I recommend using Grape seed oil. All the benifits of olive oil withou out the taste. Also has a higher smoking point therefore is more stable for table top cooking.
      But whatever you do don’t use seasame oil as you main oil you will ruin your dish. Seasame has much too strong a taste. I wouldn’t even put a little on in the end. It doesn’t belong in DKB….

  12. Eric R Thibodeau says:

    Hi, Thanks or the recipe. It is pretty close to what you’ll find in the local shops. However, as you sister pointed out, it’s not 100%. I thionk there are 2 elements that are causing the slight difference.
    1st- The use of chicken breast, Here in Korea you would not get an all white meat DakKalbi. Yes boneless, but there would be some skin and some brown meat in the mix. This would have a major impact on the flavor.
    2nd- You would not find people using olive oil in korea. Probably soybean oil or canolla. If you are worried about the saturated fats in those oils. I recommend grapeseed oil. It doesn’t have the lingering taste of olive oil.

    I did the recpie as is and am thuroughly satisfied with the results but I will be tweaking it in the ways mentioned above next time. And I am quite convnced it will be spot on!

    Let me know what you think and Thanks again for the recipe!

    Eric…

    • Hi Eric,

      You’re quite right about using the whole chicken instead of chichen breast. But I just didn’t want to deal with the bones and skins that I don’t like so much. :)

      Also I now use rice bran oil when stir frying. It’s been great!

      Happy cooking

  13. Well, this is good stuff, but I think I prefer Recipe 1.

    I’m a big fan of dalkgalbi, and cook it about once a month (using your recipe 1). Interestingly, I went to the dalkgalbi street in Chuncheon about a week ago, and ate in one of the more famous places. It was good, but not the best I’ve ever had. The best I’ve had is near the small park behind Hyundai Department Store in Sinchon (the park where the lesbians meet). There’s always a guy standing outside yelling for customers, and the place is always packed.

  14. I have been craving for this dish since I came back from Seoul…..and thank GOD I found your site, this is the closest I have found so far! Now I just need to find somewhere in Singapore that sells some of the KR ingredients and I am going to COOK! THanks so much!

  15. yah its nice to prefare a lunch delicious food i love it.
    i hope that i know how to cook that will i would like to thanks the chief of that food tnx and more powers

  16. I made this as “Dubu Galbi” for my veggie pals…Just used chunks of tofu that had been “toughened up” by searing in a pan or under a broiler. Worked great! I also used Indian curry…I think it made the taste a bit more spicy and complex. Thanks for this site! I love making all this ‘restaurant food’ at home.

  17. Hi Sue! I can’t wait to try this recipe. One question, though — when I lived in Korea, my friend always kept baekhwa in the kitchen for cooking. Can I use that instead of the hankeunsul? Or are they the same thing?

  18. One last question they serve this soup that has little pieces of what looks like chopped up scallions before the meal. Do you have a name and recipe for that as well.

  19. I am so excited to make this for my boyfriend. I lived in Korea for about a year. I think I ate at this place in Chuncheon at least every weekend. I LOVED LOVED it. I have been looking online for a recipe and stumbled acrossed your site. The pictures look just like the food I ate in Korea. My question for you, is what kind of lettuce should I use? I am not a fan of Iceberg (tastes watered down) However, the lettuce they used in Korea was awesome. I couldn’t get enough of it. I just don’t know what kind it is. THANK YOU so much for posting this recipe. I can’t wait to try it. I miss the food so much. Your recipe makes it look easy and managable.

  20. wow! looks great!^^
    ~mmmmm….~ (^-^)

  21. Marian, Korean curry powder is called “ì¹´ë ˆ”. I think using other kinds of curry powder might be OK too. However, Korean curry package contains low percentage of real curry and is added some salt as well. Just keep that in your mind.

  22. sue, question what do u call the korean curry powder in korean? i tried asking the grocery they didnt seem familiar. will using the normal curry powder turn out a different taste? i tried the on in chuncheon when i went to korea, it was really yummy unforgettable taste! one of my favorites. ill have to make this. hahaha ^^

  23. Lucas Kajok says:

    Hi Sue

    I’ve tried your “Dakgalbi” & “Dakgalbi Version 2″ recipes and they were delicious. We LOVE the rice cakes, first time we’ve tasted them. Thanks for the tip on soaking them prior to cooking. We’ll have to try the “Sugar High, Stir Fried Rice Cake and Noodles (Rabokki)”, it sounds yum!

    Thanks for posting your many recipes. I’ve tried a quite a few now and they are all so tasty. Thanks to Chef Sue!

  24. Hi Galvestonian,
    That’s great! You are a good man. :)

  25. Galvestonian says:

    I made this for my wife’s birthday dinner Saturday evening. It turned out GREAT!!! And she loved it. Thank you for this wonderful recipe. :mrgreen:

  26. Scott, UK might be a bit difficult to find these ingredients than in the US, though it really depends on which part of UK you live. Good luck!

    Mary, That is great! Tasty Dakgalbi is my favourite food in the world. By the way, didn’t you get drunk from that amount of soju? :)

    Kat, It is very delicious. Since lots of Japanese tourists in Korea have been to dakgalbi street, this food should be popular in Japan too.

    simcooks, Well, it isn’t as spicy as you think. :)

    Melting Wok, for this meal we use red chili paste (gochujang), and chili powder. I don’t use any kimchi. I’m not sure what you mean about what you saw at the market.

    pablopabla, Although I haven’t watched many episodes of Dae jang Geum, I do appreciate your compliment.

  27. Reading your blog is like watching Dae Jang Geum. :)

  28. yummy, spicy korean chili peppers and curry..wow ! :) By the way, I was at the korean market and I looked and looked and couldn’t find the difference between the kimchi red chili peppers mix in the plastic bag and the red chili peppers for cooking this sorta dish, are they kind of the same ? Thanks for sharing, cheers :)

  29. The sauce looks very spicy! I need cold water!

  30. ooh, that looks delicious. :)

  31. Sue
    Thanks for stopping by my site and letting me know you’re out there. I’ll have to stop in often for recipes!

  32. Looks great. I just made a dak galbi dish (inspired by your orginal), I’m calling it Soju Dak Galbi because I marinated my chicken in half a cup of soju. I also added ramyeon to mine. I’m trying to recreate the dak galbi I had at Cock’s in Gwang-ju. Aside from your, it was the best I’ve ever tasted.

  33. Sounds good – but now I’ve got to try and find all of those complicated ingredients!

Trackbacks

  1. […] from: My Korean Kitchen […]

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  3. […] he needed to do some shopping for Saturday as he will be cooking a Korean dish for me to taste: 닭갈비 – Dakgalbi. I cannot wait to taste […]

  4. […] experiment of sorts. Thank goodness for the internet. :O I loosely adapted this from here and here (as usual, it was dependent on what I did and did not have in my […]

  5. […] have any taste on its own. But because of that, it makes a great companion to other dishes such as Dakgalbi (Spicy Korean chicken stir fry), Ddeokbokki (Spicy Korean rice cakes) etc. Its Korean name is […]

  6. […] a big disappointment, I came home and made this Dakgalbi. I didn’t have many ingredients so it was really simple but good enough to make me feel […]

  7. […] I can see the whiteness of it from the surface. Meaning I much prefer eating spiced up dishes like Dak Kalbi (닭갈비) or deep fried chicken like Yangnum chicken (양념통닭). Here my mum would say “You still have […]

  8. […] I had Dakgalbi as a main dish. It was really good, as if I had it in a restaurant. You can get the Dakgalbi recipe from my blog as well if you […]

  9. […] experiment of sorts. Thank goodness for the internet. :O I loosely adapted this from here and here (as usual, it was dependent on what I did and did not have in my […]

  10. […] If this has wet your appetite you can learn how to cook it on mykoreankitchen.com […]

  11. […] seek the best or the original. Something with a story involved. This week’s guilty pleasure: Dalkgalbi. So obviously, that […]

  12. […] you want to try an make your own Dakgalbi check out the restaurant here at MyKoreanKitchen. PHP Freelancer Tags: "Dak Galbi", Budget travel, Budget Travelers Sandbox, Dakgalbi, food, […]

  13. […] to the North Korean border, over the South Korean Peace Dam and into Chuncheon for some much needed Dalk-Galbi. […]

  14. […] Alkuperäinen ohje löytyy täältä. […]

  15. […] via Delicious! Dakgalbi (Marinated Chicken in Spicy Sauce), Version 2 | My Korean Kitchen. […]

  16. […] supermarket that sells the various ingredients (such as gochujang) that you’ll need.  One recipe I found comes from an amateur Korean cook who hosts a bog titled ‘My Korean […]

  17. […] supermarket that sells the various ingredients (such as gochujang) that you’ll need.  One recipe I found comes from an amateur Korean cook who hosts a bog titled ‘My Korean […]

  18. […] rib meat). Well, today while browsing the forums over on Dave’s, someone posted a link to a recipe over on the My Korean Kitchen […]

  19. […] a dakalbi recipe you can make at home, check out My Korean Kitchen.  It’s a great Korean food blog I found a couple days ago that has recipes for Korean food […]

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