Home » Korean Side Dishes (Banchan) » Jangjorim (Soy Sauce Beef and Quail Eggs)

Jangjorim (Soy Sauce Beef and Quail Eggs)

Jangjorim is a Korean soy sauce braised beef and egg dish that is savory and hearty. The beef is slightly salty and tender, and the braised quail eggs are a fun bonus. Try it today to add some savory deliciousness to your next Korean meal!

Finished Jangjorim, soy braised beef and quail eggs, in a glass container.

What is Jangjorim

Jangjorim (장조림) is a Korean dish consisting of soy sauce braised beef and often boiled eggs or quail eggs. It is traditionally made with beef, but you can also use pork.

It is a popular banchan (side dish) that is often served with a bowl of rice. The beef is simmered in a soy sauce based marinade, resulting in a sweet, salty and savory dish that is perfect for any occasion.

My Best Cooking Tips

Cut of Meat

There are many cuts of beef that can be used for jangjorim, depending on what you have available or what your preferences are. Some common cuts include eye round, brisket, flank steak, and shank as they are less expensive than other premium cuts.

The cooking time may vary depending on the cut of meat, so make sure to allow some room for variance before starting to cook. Additionally, some cuts of beef need to be sliced thinly while others can easily be shredded by hand.

If you’re using pork, leaner options like pork loin or tenderloin are good choices if you want to avoid fat. 

Eggs or No Eggs

Many Koreans use either hard boiled quail eggs or chicken eggs when making jangjorim. Quail eggs are a popular ingredient in Korea and are easy to find; you can even buy them pre-peeled, which saves a lot of time. Peeled quail eggs can be found in a plastic sealed bag or in a tin.

I haven’t seen Korean brand peeled quail eggs in my area yet, but I’ve seen tinned quail eggs at a Korean grocer. These are from Thailand and they come soaked in water or brine; you will need to drain and rinse them before use.

Quail eggs in a tin, and drained quail eggs in a clear bowl.

Chilies or No Chilies

While it’s optional, many Koreans like adding some shishito peppers to jangjorim for a bit of chili flavor without too much heat. These peppers are milder in flavor, and can add a unique taste without being too spicy. They also have a sweet taste with an earthy, smoky flavor. 

If shishito peppers are not available, then padron, jalapeño, or cayenne pepper can be used instead. Keep in mind that the spice level will be different.

Fat

You may notice some oil floating to the top of the sauce when it is chilled. However, this doesn’t affect the taste.

If you want to minimize this from happening, you can put the sauce after braising the meat in the freezer for a few hours. The oil will separate and float to the top, and you can spoon it off. Another option is to reheat the jangjorim just before serving, which will melt the fat back into the dish.

Jangjorim served with a bowl of white rice and other side dishes such as rolled egg omelette, dried seaweed and white kimchi.

What To Eat with Jangjorim

Jangjorim has a slightly salty and sweet taste, so a plain bowl of rice is all you need to make a quick meal.

Of course, you can also add other Korean side dishes to make it more elaborate. Some examples of such dishes include Kimchi, Korean Egg Rolls, Seasoned Seaweed, Spicy Korean Dried Squid.

You can also serve with Korean soup or stew, such as Bean Sprout Soup and Doenjang Jjigae. These soups and stews are hearty and filling, and can really round out a meal. Just thinking about all these different combinations makes me hungry!

Holding Jangjorim with a pair of chopsticks.

How To Store

Jangjorim can be served either cold or warm, though it is typically eaten cold. It is best eaten within three days of being made, but it can last up to one week when refrigerated in an airtight container.

If you make a large batch, you can portion and freeze it for later use. Jangjorim will last for up to three months in the freezer.

Other Korean Side Dishes You Might Like

I love braised dishes because they bring out so much depth of flavor. If you’re like me, here are some of my braised Korean side dishes. I hope you enjoy them as much as I do.

Soy braised beef and quail eggs served in a bowl, a pair of chopsticks on the side.

Ingredients for Jangjorim

Meat

  • 600g / 1.3 pounds beef – eye round, brisket, flank steak, or shank – if the cut is too thick, cut it in 2 to 3 pieces
  • 200g / 7 ounces quail eggs, or 4 chicken eggs, hard boiled, peeled and cleaned

Broth

  • 4 cups water
  • 2 Tbsp rice wine, sweet (mirin)
  • 130g / 4.6 ounces onion, peeled and cut into quadrant chunks
  • 15g, 0.5 ounces green onion, white part
  • 10g / 0.4 ounces ginger, peeled and rinsed
  • 1 tsp whole black pepper
  • 1 tsp fine sea salt

Sauce

  • 1/3 cup & 2 Tbsp soy sauce, regular (I use kikkoman brand)
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1 to 2 green chili or shishito pepper

*1 Tbsp = 15 ml, 1 cup = 250 ml

How to Make Jangjorim

1. Soak the beef in cold water for about 30 minutes to draw out the redness (myoglobin) on the meat.

Soaking beef in a clear bowl of water.

2. Put the beef and broth ingredients into a medium-sized pot. Boil it for about 15 minutes on medium-high heat without the lid on. This helps to evaporate the gamey smell from the meat. While boiling, scoop out any bubbles that form in the pot and discard them.

Boiling beef with aromatic ingredients in a large pot.

3. Sieve the boiled water (broth) over a bowl or pot, reserving about 3 cups of broth and the beef. Discard the rest of the aromatic vegetables.

Straining beef broth into a large glass measuring cup.

4. Cool down the beef for 5 to 10 minutes so it will be easier to handle. You can cut the meat into strips by following the muscle lines with your fingers, or for more even pieces, cut it into index finger-length (6-7 cm / 2.5 inch) strips that are 1 cm / 0.4 inch in width. The traditional method is to tear the beef with your hands, but I prefer cutting with a knife.

Slicing beef on a wooden cutting board.

5. Place the 3 cups of broth in a clean pot. Then, add the soy sauce and sugar. Boil the pot on medium-high heat with a lid on.

Pouring soy sauce over a pot of beef broth.

6. When the sauce starts to boil, add the beef, quail eggs, and green chilies. Boil them on medium heat without a lid on for 30 minutes. Remove from the heat.

Boiling beef, quail eggs and green chili in a pot of Jangjorim sauce.

7. Transfer the beef, quail eggs, and chili into a glass container. Pour the sauce into the container. To serve, dish out a small portion of meat and quail eggs in a serving bowl and serve with a bowl of rice and other Korean side dishes.

Soy braised beef and quail egg scooped with a spoon over a bowl of white rice.

Love Korean food? Browse lots more Korean recipes from my easy Korean recipe collections. And subscribe to my newsletter for all of the latest updates including new recipes, what MKK communities are cooking and K-Dramas!

Finished Jangjorim, soy braised beef and quail eggs, in a glass container.

Jangjorim (Soy Sauce Beef and Quail Eggs)

Jangjorim is a Korean soy sauce braised beef and egg dish that is savory and hearty. This popular recipe is delicious and addictive, and a must-try!
5 from 1 vote
Print Pin Rate Save
Course: Side dishes
Cuisine: Korean
Keyword: jangjorim, korean quail eggs, soy sauce beef
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 50 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 20 minutes
Servings: 8
Calories: 280kcal
Author: Sue | My Korean Kitchen

Ingredients

MEAT

  • 600 g beef - eye round, brisket, flank steak, or shank (1.3 pounds)
  • 200 g quail egg (7 ounces) or 4 chicken eggs, hard boiled, peeled and cleaned

BROTH

  • 4 cups water
  • 2 Tbsp rice wine , sweet (mirin)
  • 130 g onion (4.6 ounces), peeled and cut into quadrant chunks
  • 15 g green onion (0.5 ounces), white part
  • 10 g ginger (0.4 ounces), peeled and rinsed
  • 1 tsp whole black pepper
  • 1 tsp fine sea salt

SAUCE

  • 110 ml soy sauce ,  regular (I use kikkoman brand), 1/3 cup & 2 Tbsp
  • 1/4 cups brown sugar
  • 1-2 green chili or shishito pepper

Instructions

  • Soak the beef in cold water for about 30 minutes to draw out the redness (myoglobin) on the meat.
  • Put the beef and broth ingredients into a medium-sized pot. Boil it for about 15 minutes on medium-high heat without the lid on. This helps to evaporate the gamey smell from the meat. While boiling, scoop out any bubbles that form in the pot and discard them.
  • Sieve the boiled water (broth) over a bowl or pot, reserving about 3 cups of broth and the beef. Discard the rest of the aromatic vegetables.
  • Cool down the beef for 5 to 10 minutes so it will be easier to handle. You can cut the meat into strips by following the muscle lines with your fingers, or for more even pieces, cut it into index finger-length (6-7 cm / 2.5 inch) strips that are 1 cm / 0.4 inch in width. The traditional method is to tear the beef with your hands, but I prefer cutting with a knife.
  • Place the 3 cups of broth in a clean pot. Then, add the soy sauce and sugar. Boil the pot on medium-high heat with a lid on.
  • When the sauce starts to boil, add the beef, quail eggs, and green chilies. Boil them on medium heat without a lid on for 30 minutes. Remove from the heat.
  • Transfer the beef, quail eggs, and chili into a glass container. Pour the sauce into the container. To serve, dish out a small portion of meat and quail eggs in a serving bowl and serve with a bowl of rice and other Korean side dishes.

Notes

  • 1 Tbsp = 15 ml, 1 cup = 250 ml
  • Jangjorim can be served either cold or warm. It is best eaten within three days of being made, but it can last up to one week when refrigerated in an airtight container.

Nutrition Info (per serving)

Calories: 280kcal | Carbohydrates: 10g | Protein: 18g | Fat: 18g | Saturated Fat: 7g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 8g | Trans Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 264mg | Sodium: 1157mg | Potassium: 316mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 8g | Vitamin A: 158IU | Vitamin C: 2mg | Calcium: 50mg | Iron: 3mg

The nutrition information shown is an estimate provided by an online nutrition calculator. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist’s advice.

Tried this recipe?I love hearing how you went with my recipes! Rate this recipe with a comment below and tag me on Instagram @MyKoreanKitchen.
Tagged with: beef, egg

Written by: Sue

Published on:

Photo of author
Welcome to my Korean kitchen! I’m so happy that you're here. I am Sue, the creator behind My Korean Kitchen (since 2006). I love good food and simplifying recipes. Here you will find my best and family approved recipes. Thanks for stopping by!

NEVER MISS A NEW RECIPE

Join 20,000+ other Korean food lovers! Get the latest recipes from My Korean Kitchen delivered to your email inbox. It's free!

I will only send you emails related to My Korean Kitchen. Unsubscribe at any time.

Copyright: Unless otherwise noted, all photography and content on this site is the intellectual property of Sue Pressey of My Korean Kitchen. Please do not copy and/or paste full recipes and images to any social media channels or websites without my prior written consent. This is strictly prohibited. You may however, use a single image and a summary of my article in your own words, provided that proper attribution is given to myself and an appropriate link back to my original recipe. Thank you.

Disclosure: My Korean Kitchen is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
Rate This Recipe With Your Comment




22 Comments
Newest
Oldest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments

NEVER MISS A NEW RECIPE

Join 20,000+ other Korean food lovers!

Get the latest recipes from My Korean Kitchen delivered to your email inbox. It's free!

Connect

NEVER MISS A NEW RECIPE

Join 20,000+ other Korean food lovers! Get the latest recipes from

My Korean Kitchen delivered to your email inbox. It's free!