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Jangjorim (Soy Sauce Beef and Quail Eggs)

Delicious and addictive Jangjorim recipe! It’s a popular Korean side dish.

Jangjorim (Korean Soy Sauce Beef and Quail's Egg) | MyKoreanKitchen.com

Jangjorim (장조림) is a traditional Korean side dish. It’s made with beef and eggs.

Though, in this recipe, I used quail eggs (because it’s so cheap and easy to get in Korea!) but if you can’t get them, you can use normal hard boiled eggs instead.

Soy sauce braised beef and eggs are tender and they are sweet and salty at the same time. So it’s quite addictive! I haven’t seen anyone who dislike Jangjorim yet! We even used the sauce to mix with some rice and it was very nice!

My husband jokingly told me not to share this recipe because it is so tasty, but I decided to share it with you. 🙂

Just keep in mind, if you’re using some quail eggs, you will need some patience when you peel the egg shells. (No jokes!) I hope you enjoy my recipe.

P.S. If you like this recipe, you might also like my soy sauce eggs too!

Ingredients for Jangjorim (Soy Sauce Beef)

  • 250g beef brisket
  • 2 packs quail’s eggs (one pack holds 28 eggs) – This can be substituted with normal eggs.
  • 200g white radish / daikon
  • 1 small onion, peeled and with the ends cut off
  • 1 stalk green onion
  • 5 cups water
  • 2 Tbsp rice wine
  • 2 tsp whole black pepper
  • 1 tsp ginger powder
  • 1 cup water
  • 20 g dried kelp
  • 100 ml soy sauce
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1 green chili

How to Make Jangjorim

1. Soak the beef in cold water for about 30 mins. This is to get rid of the blood. During this time, change the water a few times. When 30 mins is up, drain the water and set aside.

Ingredients for Jangjorim

2. Soak dried kelp in 1 cup of water for about 30 mins. We only need the water from it. Discard the kelp.

3. In rolling boiling water, boil the quail’s eggs. When the eggs are cooked, drain the water. Cool the eggs down with cold water and peel the egg shells. Rinse the eggs in cold water just in case some bits of shells stuck on them.

Boiling eggs

4. Put the beef, radish, onion, and green onion in a pot. Add the 5 cups of water and add the rice wine, black pepper, and ginger powder. Boil it for about 15 minutes over medium high heat.

Making broth

5. Sieve the water. (We will need 2 cups of this water/broth and the beef. Discard the remains.)

6. Tear the beef with your hands by following its shape. Or you can use a knife to cut it.

Boiled meat

 

Cooking Jangjorim

7. Put the 2 cups of broth (from step 5) and 1 cup of kelp soaked water (from step 2) into a clean pot. Add the soy sauce and sugar and boil it over medium high heat.

8. Once it starts to boil, add the quail’s eggs, torn beef, and green chili. Boil them over medium heat until half the sauce disappears. (Stir it every 3 minutes.) Remove from the heat.

9. Cool it down for about 30 mins. Serve. (You can store unused portion in an air tight container for a few days. Refrigerate it.)

Jangjorim (Korean Soy Sauce Beef and Quail's Egg) | MyKoreanKitchen.com

Jangjorim (Soy Sauce Beef and Quail’s Eggs)

How to make Jangjorim. Soy braised beef and quail's egg recipe.
5 from 1 vote
Print Pin Rate
Course: Side dishes
Cuisine: Korean
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 45 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
Servings: 8
Calories: 114kcal
Author: Sue | My Korean Kitchen

Ingredients

  • 250 g beef brisket
  • 2 packs quail egg (one pack holds 28 eggs) – This can be substituted with normal eggs.
  • 200 g white radish / daikon radish
  • 1 small onion , peeled and with the ends cut off
  • 1 stalk green onion
  • 5 cups water
  • 2 Tbsp rice wine
  • 2 tsp whole black pepper
  • 1 tsp ginger powder
  • 1 cup water
  • 20 g dried kelp
  • 100 ml soy sauce
  • 1/4 cups brown sugar
  • 1 green chili

Instructions

  • Soak the beef in cold water for about 30 mins. This is to get rid of the blood. During this time, change the water a few times. When 30 mins is up, drain the water and set aside.
  • Soak dried kelp in 1 cup of water for about 30 mins. We only need the water from it. Discard the kelp.
  • In rolling boiling water, boil the quail’s eggs. When the eggs are cooked, drain the water. Cool the eggs down with cold water and peel the egg shells. Rinse the eggs in cold water just in case some bits of shells stuck on them.
  • Put the beef, radish, onion, and green onion in a pot. Add the 5 cups of water and add the rice wine, black pepper, and ginger powder. Boil it for about 15 minutes over medium high heat.
  • Sieve the water. (We will need 2 cups of this water/broth and the beef. Discard the remains.)
  • Tear the beef with your hands by following its shape. Or you can use a knife to cut it.
  • Put the 2 cups of broth (from step 5) and 1 cup of kelp soaked water (from step 2) into a clean pot. Add the soy sauce and sugar and boil it over medium high heat.
  • Once it starts to boil, add the quail’s eggs, torn beef, and green chili. Boil them over medium heat until half the sauce disappears. (Stir it every 3 minutes.) Remove from the heat.
  • Cool it down for about 30 mins. Serve. (You can store unused portion in an air tight container for a few days. Refrigerate it.)

Nutrition

Calories: 114kcal | Carbohydrates: 11g | Protein: 9g | Fat: 3g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 78mg | Sodium: 775mg | Potassium: 239mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 8g | Vitamin A: 1.1% | Vitamin C: 9.1% | Calcium: 3.8% | Iron: 8.6%
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Written by: Sue

Last Updated: May 13, 2019

Hi, I'm Sue and I am the creator of My Korean Kitchen. Thank you for joining me in this delicious culinary journey!

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26 thoughts on “Jangjorim (Soy Sauce Beef and Quail Eggs)”

  1. Use ready boiled and peeled quail eggs. They get sold in a bag of lightly salted liquid. Easy, really easy.

    • It’s so cool that quail eggs come in ready boiled and peeled nowadays! Though I haven’t seen them myself yet in Australia, but when I do, I will definitely make them more often!!

  2. Hi – I’ve just finished eating this delicious dish. I didn’t cook it however… opened a plastic package, poured contents into bowl, and heated in microwave for 190 seconds… it was good! (www.jayeone.co.kr) But probably not nearly as good as yours.

    I write however to suggest rolling the quail eggs after boiling – crack on the sideboard and slowly roll to break the shell, which then comes off easily. It may take a bit of practice, but it will be much easier!

  3. I just made this dish for the first time. I used your recipe but did the portions a little differently and I added two cloves of garlic during the last and final boil. It came very good.

    Though it took me 2 hours. I wasn’t busy the entire time so I didn’t find it too hard. I cleaned the dishes and cleaned the kitchen etc while waiting for things.

    Though quail eggs aren’t easy to find in most American groceries in the NY area, they are were at my Korean grocers. Also I boiled my quail eggs for 4 min. I rinsed them with cold water with ice in the same pot. After the ice melted I peeled them in the water so I didn’t have to wash them later-saved me at least two steps. Also it helps if you crack the wide part of the egg (the bottom part) and make sure the shell is all cracked (I rolled them on the side of the pot) and it comes off in one peel–most of the time. I also drank two glasses of wine doing it so it went fast and was kind of fun.

    Thanks so much for the recipe. I’m not a meat fan but I loved the fact that quail eggs are used (rarely see that in the Korean restaurants around here) and I thought it would be a nice surprise for my sister who loves this dish.

  4. I’ve been looking for this dish since I seen it in a recent Korean movie called “Dirty Carnival.” The lead character/gangster prepares it alongside a rice porridge for his sick girlfriend. Can’t wait to try it.

  5. my first dinner with my korean (ex)husband we had this and a bunch of side dishes. the woman who made it for us actually used several peppers, chicken eggs & left the meat whole.. it was salty-sweet. she arranged the peppers on top of the meat so that they looked like a flower.. sort of like the ones on 화전. 🙂 it was delicious. quail eggs are indeed very expensive here, because you have to buy them from hatcheries. i was looking around online for them & for 100 of them, it’s like $55.00 shipping, and the bad thing is that they’re already fertilized.. but anyway. 🙂

    i’m definitely going to try this recipe out, because i want to taste this again. it looks beautiful and my mouth is already salivating! 😀 thank you for posting this!!

    best wishes,
    ~ 도쿠

  6. This recipe is very similar to one that my wife used in our Korean Restaurant. Due to the expense and limited availability of quail eggs, she would often substitute chicken, duck, or goose eggs. This was a favorite of our American customers.

  7. Hi tammie,

    I’ve never used canned eggs, but if they are already shelled it may make it less work. If they are preserved with salt it may change the taste though.

  8. Hi Joe,

    I didn’t know that quail’s eggs are expensive in America. As you know, they are cheaper than chicken eggs sometimes in Korea. I bought 2 packs of quail’s eggs for 2600 won (about US $2.70) Though I don’t want to cook them for a while, such hard work. 🙂

    Hi lance,

    Thanks for the tips. I think I sort of tried like you suggested for couple of quail’s eggs, but I guess I didn’t tap thoroughly enough to make it peels instantly. 🙂
    I will try properly as you suggest next time.

    Take care, you two.

  9. Thank you for taking on such a time consuming endeavor and sharing your recipe. I don’t know if it’ll work with quail eggs, but it works very well with chicken eggs. I usually tap the hardboiled egg until all the shell is in small pieces and because it’s held together by the inner membrane layer, it’s so easy to peel. The shell usually peels right off in layers. Sometimes the egg just popps out of the shell at some point. Hope it works for you.

  10. Quail eggs are such a wonderful delicacy. They’re expensive and hard to find in America. The first quail eggs I had were deviled. Now that had to have been a lot of work.

    I was excited to find them so plentiful and cheap here. So I bought some and boiled them. And, yes, peeling them is labor intensive.

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