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Jjimdak (Korean Braised Chicken)

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Jjimdak is a popular Korean braised chicken. It originated in the city of Andong, Korea. It’s savoury, mildly salty and sweet with a very subtle spicy kick. It has a somewhat complex flavour and because of that, it’s highly addictive and comforting!

Jjimdak is a popular Korean braised chicken. It's savoury, mildly salty and sweet with a very subtle spicy kick. It has a somewhat complex flavour and because of that, it's highly addictive and comforting! | MyKoreanKitchen.com

Jjimdak (찜닭, Korean braised chicken) recipe has been on my to-do list for a long time, since 2013, so I’m super excited to share it with you today!

This recipe is even more special in that it is developed by my sister! My involvement has been testing the recipe and writing more refined instructions of it.

The thing is I’ve never had Jjimdak in Korea before, but my sister had, so it was logical to involve her in the recipe development.

How to make Jjimdak - a popular Korean braised chicken | MyKoreanKitchen.com

We even visited our local Korean restaurant here that is well known for Jjimdak. It was good, but it tasted a bit artificial. Maybe they added caramel sauce or oyster sauce too much to make the dish look darker and look more appetising. Whatever it was, we couldn’t eat too much of it. We’ve yet to discover a good Jjimdak restaurant here!

On the contrary, you can eat our Jjimdak over and over. OK, I might be biassed, but my daughter absolutely adores this Jjimdak! It is the only dish lately that she asks for a second serving! (I struggle every day to make her eat with all the other food, but this one is exception!)

I don’t know the restaurant’s secret’s sauce, but our Jjimdak is braised in soy sauce and honey infused sauce. Of course, the usual Korean essential spices, garlic and ginger are added too.

Jjimdak (Korean Braised Chicken) | MyKoreanKitchen.com

It has a slightly salty and sweet flavour, but it gives a mild spice kick to your taste buds as well because there are some dried chillies too.  While dried chillies can be omitted or added more per your liking, they certainly make the flavour more complex, in a good way.  So I highly recommend you adding it at least as much as we did. 😉

In my opinion, the best part about Jjimdak is you don’t need additional side dishes or soup to serve with it. All you need is a bowl of hot steamed rice! There’s enough sauce so you can mix your rice with it. I also love the braised potatoes and glass noodles in it. They make the best side dishes! Yummo!

I hope you try our recipe soon! Enjoy!

P.S. There is also a spicy version of Korean braised chicken. It’s called Dakdoritang (닭도리탕) or Dakbokkeumtang (닭볶음탕). And I have a slow cooker version if you would like to try it out! Check my Slow Cooker Korean Spicy Braised Chicken and Potatoes.

Ingredients for 4 servings

Jjimdak (Korean Braised Chicken) Ingredients

Main

  • 800g/1.8 pounds chicken (I used a mix of chicken drumettes & wingettes and thigh fillets), cut into medium sized chunks
  • 5 cups water to parboil the chicken
  • 2 medium potatoes (340g/12 ounces), cut into medium sized chunks
  • 1 medium carrot (170g/6 ounces), cut into medium sized chunks
  • 1 large brown onion (210g/7.4 ounces), cut into medium sized chunks
  • 5 dried small red chillies (2g/0.07 ounces)  (I used Thai chillies, but you can use Korean chillies if you can get them)
  • 150g/5.3 ounces Korean glass noodles, soaked in warm water for about 20 mins to hydrate, drain before use
  • 3 button mushrooms or shiitake mushrooms (80g/2.8 ounces), thinly sliced
  • 1 stalk of green onion (20g/0.7 ounces), diagonally chopped
  • 1 tsp roasted sesame seeds

Sauce (Mix these in a bowl)

* 1 Tbsp = 15 ml, 1 Cup = 250 ml

**If you want to learn more about Korean cooking ingredients, check my 30 essential Korean cooking ingredients list!

How to Make Jjimdak

1.On medium-high heat, boil the water (5 cups) in a medium sized pot. Once it’s rolling boiling, parboil the chicken for 1 minute to skim off any fat. Drain the water.

Jjimdak - Chicken Parboiled

2. In a clean pot (I used this braising pot), add the chicken and the sauce. Boil them over medium-high heat for about 10 mins, covered.

Jjimdak- Braising chicken in soy based sauce

3. Add the potatoes, carrots, onions and chillies and boil for a further 7 mins, covered. Reduce the heat to medium and stir gently to change the position of the chicken and the vegetables. Simmer for a further 8 mins, covered.

Jjimdak Vegetable Boiled

4. Add the glass noodles, mushrooms, and green onions and simmer until the noodles and mushrooms are cooked (about 3 to 5 mins), covered. Stir lightly to make sure the noodles and the mushrooms are mixed with the sauce.

Jjimdak (Korean braised chicken) recipe | MyKoreanKitchen.com

5. Garnish with the sesame seeds. (You can add additional green onions for extra poppy colour before serving as well.) Serve hot with a bowl of steamed rice.

Jjimdak (Korean Braised Chicken) | MyKoreanKitchen.com


How to make Jjimdak - a popular Korean braised chicken | MyKoreanKitchen.com

Jjimdak (Korean Braised Chicken)

Jjimdak is a popular Korean braised chicken. It originated in the city of Andong, Korea. It’s savoury, mildly salty and sweet with a very subtle spicy kick. It has a somewhat complex flavour and because of that, it’s highly addictive and comforting!
4.91 from 11 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: Main
Cuisine: Korean
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 40 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour
Servings: 4
Calories: 513
Author: Sue | My Korean Kitchen

Ingredients

MAIN

  • 800 g chicken (1.8 pounds), cut into medium sized chunks, I used a mix of chicken drumettes & wingettes and thigh fillets
  • 5 cups water to parboil the chicken
  • 2 medium potatoes (340 g / 12 ounces) cut into medium sized chunks
  • 1 medium carrot (170 g / 6 ounces), cut into medium sized chunks
  • 1 large brown onion (210 g / 7.4 ounces), cut into medium sized chunks
  • 5 dried small red chillies (2 g / 0.07 ounces), I used Thai chillies but you can use Korean chillies if you can get them
  • 150 g Korean glass noodles (5.3 ounces), soaked in warm water for about 20 mins to hydrate, drain before use
  • 3 button mushrooms or shiitake mushrooms (80 g / 2.8 ounces), thinly sliced,
  • 1 stalk of green onion (20 g / 0.7 ounces), diagonally chopped,
  • 1 tsp toasted sesame seeds

SAUCE (MIX THESE IN A BOWL)

  • 1 1/2 cup water
  • 1/3 cup soy sauce
  • 2 Tbsp raw sugar or dark brown sugar
  • 2 Tbsp rice wine/mirin
  • 1 Tbsp honey
  • 1 Tbsp msg free oyster sauce
  • 1 Tbsp minced garlic
  • 1/2 tsp minced ginger
  • 2 tsp sesame oil
  • 1/4 tsp ground black pepper

Instructions

  • On medium-high heat, boil the water (5 cups) in a medium sized pot. Once it’s rolling boiling, parboil the chicken for 1 minute to skim off any fat. Drain the water.
  • In a clean pot (I used this braising pot), add the chicken and the sauce. Boil them over medium-high heat for about 10 mins, covered.
  • Add the potatoes, carrots, onions and chillies and boil for a further 7 mins, covered. Reduce the heat to medium and stir gently to change the position of the chicken and the vegetables. Simmer for a further 8 mins, covered.
  • Add the glass noodles, mushrooms, and green onions and simmer until the noodles and mushrooms are cooked (about 3 to 5 mins), covered. Stir lightly to make sure the noodles and the mushrooms are mixed with the sauce.
  • Garnish with the sesame seeds. (You can add additional green onions for extra poppy colour before serving as well.) Serve hot with a bowl of steamed rice.

Notes

1 Tbsp = 15 ml, 1 Cup = 250 ml

Nutrition

Calories: 513kcal | Carbohydrates: 63g | Protein: 24g | Fat: 17g | Saturated Fat: 4g | Cholesterol: 72mg | Sodium: 1319mg | Potassium: 810mg | Fiber: 4g | Sugar: 13g | Vitamin A: 2875IU | Vitamin C: 18.2mg | Calcium: 88mg | Iron: 5.8mg
Tried this recipe?I love hearing how you went with my recipes! Leave a comment below or Tag me on Instagram @MyKoreanKitchen.

 

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Written by: Sue

Last Updated: May 13, 2019

Hi, I'm Sue and I am the creator of My Korean Kitchen. Thank you for joining me in this delicious culinary journey!

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45 thoughts on “Jjimdak (Korean Braised Chicken)”

    • Hi Maggie, You can feed 4 to 5 people when you serve with rice. Alternatively, you can adjust the serving size in the recipe card above. The size of ingredients will change accordingly.

  1. Hi Sue, hello from Singapore and thanks for the recipe! It’s easy to prepare and delicious! This comforting dish is going to be a regular on our dinner table

  2. Hi Sue. I’m jihan from south korea. First, i want to say thank you abt this web page. It’s lovely. I never heard abt this kitchen before. my best friend from czech just show me this today. And i like it.
    This Kitchen would be the best way to explain abt korean cuisine for my friends (they all love korean foods. sepcially, gukbap and kimchi. we called that hangover soup haha. is there any recipe abt gukbap?). Thanks again. I didnt check your others yet but i will. 🙂

    Oh one more, How abt Red pepper paste? I know Andong one is the origin but all my friends love another one, with red pepper paste! More recently made cuisine but way more popular nowdays here. Its personal preference so never mind but all this kitchen users there, plz try this, red pepper paste Jjimdak. It will blow your tongue. and head 🙂 (My favorite!)

    Ohhhh Top secret here it is. Put some cheese on it.(as much as you can!) But then you have to put some more spicy. spicy with cheese? Best ever. Hot steam will melt cheese down so super cheesy but not too rich taste. Plus not too spicy. “Nowdays here in korea, everybody love Red pepper paste cheese jjimdak!”
    I would show this to my mother soon as i can. She is dietitian so gladly she will cook jjimdak for her little pleasure, jihan 🙂 (even if i’m not small anymore :D)

    And kinda weird you never had jjimdak back home! Here in korea so many jjimdak place. Even Two jjimdak place right infront of my house 🙂 Sry its little get messed but i’m so exciting that i find this! Thanks again!.

    • Hey Jihan, Thanks for stopping by My Korean Kitchen! The only hangover soup I can think of now is https://mykoreankitchen.com/bean-sprout-soup-kongnamul-guk/. But for sure, I will add more recipes down the track.

      Also, thanks for suggesting jjimdak recipe with red pepper paste. Is it different to cheese buldak? I want to make sure I’m not mixing up food. 🙂
      Anyway, I will try these when I visit Korea next time. My list is piling up! Thank you!

  3. Really delicious! And easy! It was too spicy for my 2-year-old, so in the future I will use a bell pepper instead of the chili peppers (she loved it but was then surprised by the spice!).

    • Great to hear you enjoyed it! If you want, you can omit the dried chilies completely. I add less or omit them sometimes depending on who’s eating it. 🙂

  4. My problem is that after a pre-diabetes diagnosis I am avoiding all sugar. What happens to Korean recipes if you skip the sugar? Any ideas for substitution?

    • Some people use stevia as a substitute but I would assume you will have to change the quantity to match the taste. Have you used it before?

  5. Hi Sue! I have had Jjimdak in Seoul and loved it! I have also made it before but can’t find the recipe, so I found yours and it looks yummy! My son-in-law just brought me some glass noodles on his last visit so I’m wanting to make it again….anyway I was wondering if this recipe could be adapted to make in a crock pot? Any ideas? Thanks!

    • Hi Diane, I haven’t tried Jjimdak in a crock pot. I’m sure it’s possible but I wouldn’t know what to adjust without experimenting it. 🙂 Let us know how yours goes. Cheers

    • Hi John, You don’t have to take off any skin. Why did you get that impression from my recipe? 🙂 Though, naturally, if your chicken has lots of skin on, it may produce more “floating fat” when you parboil it (in step 1).

  6. Ahnyeong haseyo Sue!

    I eat this when I went to Seoul last month and I love it so much! Ive tried this recipe with a bit of modification (since Im a Muslim and any form of alchohol is prohibited in our cooking) and it turned out to be my family’s favourite dish.

    Kamsa hamnida!

  7. I have tried a few Jjimdak recipes before I saw yours. Since I’ve not eaten Jjimdak before, I followed those recipes to the tee.

    But my husband, who travels to Seoul every month and has eaten this dish a few times, tells me my Jjimdak doesn’t taste like the ones he’s eaten in Korea. He says my version is more like the Chinese soy sauce chicken.

    This is until I used your recipe. He says it tastes like Jjimdak in Seoul and is delicious. I really like it myself too. I think it’s the best version among all the recipes I have tried.

    • Thanks! I haven’t tried Jjimdak in Seoul, so I can’t tell you for sure. 🙂 I’m sure each restaurant will have different versions. Anyway, I’m so happy to hear that your family loved my recipe! 😀

  8. I decided to make this recipe last week and I have a funny story to share. I’m slightly obsessed with all things Korean, from food, to Kdramas, to traditional clothing. My 10 year old son rolls his eyes at me for it. He doesn’t realize that I’ve been obsessed with many Asian cultures since I was little. Well, this recipe came out and I HAD to try it. The day I made it, he looked at me and started whining and complaining, asking why I had to make food like this. Guess who loved it as much as I did? Yep, my 10 year old!

    Thank you for sharing the part of your culture! I have loved seeing the recipes come to my inbox and the ones I have tried I have loved!

  9. Hi Sue. Thanks for a great recipe. I made it yesterday and it was REALLY good. As soon as the sauce started to boil (step 2) the smell was incredible and I knew it was going to taste great. Anyway, I just had one tiny problem. When I added the glass noodles, they soaked up all the sauce and there was none left to pour on the rice or even to go with the chicken and vegetables (they still were coated with sauce, so the taste was there anyway)… I put the right amount of noodles so I don’t know why this happened. Great recipe anyway, but I might double the sauce ingredients next time to make sure I have some left in the end. 😉

    • Hi Arlo, what types of pot did you use? I found that a regular stainless saucepan boils differently to a braising pot I used above. They tend to boil faster. Therefore, water disappears/evaporates faster. So if all other conditions were the same, that could be it. Regardless, it’s good to hear that you enjoyed my recipe!

  10. Hi Sue, I wrote a quick review of your Dalk-galbi a couple of years ago, probably the best dalk-galbi I’ve ever eaten. I just made this dish tonight and it was unbelievable. Best I’ve ever eaten.

    Thank you so much! It was a hit with the whole family.

    • Hi Bill, Yes, I remember your revivew on my dak galbi recipe! 🙂 I’m so happy to hear that you enjoyed my Jjimdak recipe as well! Awesome!

  11. Hello. I watch a lot of Korean dramas. What is rice cake and what does it taste like. It’s the red one. thank you.

  12. Sue, the ingredients look good. Thanks for sharing! I like one dish meals with rice side. I haven’t made it yet, but I am rating it based on ingredients.

  13. I tried it but replaced the oyster sauce with hoisin sauce (since I didn’t have any oyster). Turned out really well…but put in too much noodles and potatoes so it soaked up all the liquids. Will try it again w more liquid.

    • Great to hear, Junga! Yes, don’t be too greedy about the noodles and potatoes. 😉 They soak up a lot of liquid, particularly the noodles.

  14. I had something similar in Korea, but I think it also had rice cakes. It was the best dish I had there, and have been looking for a recipe. Thanks!

  15. Tell your sister that she did an excellent job. This looks delicious even though I am not a fan of glass noodles. I am gonna try this with normal thin noodles. The best thing is it can be made in one pot which is very convenient for many of us. It looks like Korean food is often a little spicy. I like that. I was in Korea in 2015 and the food was really great. Even at the airport they have really good food.

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