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Omurice (Omelette Rice)

Try this super delicious omurice (omelette rice) recipe! Fried rice is lightly covered with fancy tornado omelette and topped with lip-smackingly delicious homemade Korean style demi-glace sauce.

But of course, if you want to spare your labor of love, I also cover how to make easy omurice recipe as well. Check out my best omurice making tips below!

Korean omelette rice served on a white plate

What is Omurice

Omurice (오므라이스) or omu rice is a popular western inspired Japanese dish. The word “omurice” is a Japanese portmanteau for omelette (omelet) and rice, resulting in the name omelette rice or omelet rice. 

Omelette rice is wildly popular in Japan, but it is also very popular in Korea as well.

Omurice on a white plate with brown sauce

Korean Omelette Rice

Omurice was first introduced to Korea during the Japanese occupancy time and it became a staple dish in Korea. 

To make Korean style omurice, you stir fry finely diced vegetables and deli meat (ham or bacon) with rice. These are typically seasoned with ketchup and salt but some people also use soy sauce or Worcestershire sauce as well.

Fried rice is then wrapped around with thinly fried egg omelette and topped with another layer of ketchup or demi-glace sauce.

As the flavor is heavily reliant on sweet and tangy ketchup or more richer tasting demi-glace sauce, omurice is a particularly popular dish to kids in Korea.

Omurice is often sold at casual dinning restaurants and the most recent trend being the “tornado omurice (회오리 오므라이스)”. It references tornado because of the way you make the egg omelette. As in you keep turn your egg omelette to make a pattern of a tornado. To help your understanding on how it’s made, check out my video below. Please note, there’s no sound in this video.

My Best Cooking Tips

I want you to make delicious Korean style omurice at home and I want you to find that the process is not as overwhelming as it looks. I hope my tips are helpful!

Fried Rice

  • One of the main components of omurice is fried rice. As you may have heard, use day old rice for stir frying. If this is not available, cook the rice with slightly less water. It will give you a similar effect.
  • Making the fried rice is probably the easiest part of this recipe. Because you can easily swap the vegetable or meat ingredients that goes into fried rice per your preference. You can even use frozen mixed vegetables (e.g. peas, corn and carrots etc) to cut down the preparation time. 
  • If you’re not intending to serve the Korean style demi-glace sauce and use ketchup as a top coat sauce, you might want to add more ketchup (about 1 Tbsp) in your rice seasoning. The demi-glace sauce has a slightly stronger taste and is more flavorful, so it blends really well with your fried rice and omelette. But if you’re serving your omurice with ketchup, you might find that the overall dish is a bit bland. 

Demi-Glace Sauce

  • Demi-glace sauce is a rich brown sauce, traditionally made by combining brown stock and Espagnole sauce. The sauce is slowly simmered by half and strained. In French cuisine, this can be used as a sauce itself or as a base for other sauces. In Korea, we use demi-glace sauce for western dishes and also some westernized Japanese dishes. Today’s demi-glace sauce is made for westernized Japanese dishes, particularly omurice. This version is a short cut version and also does not include brown stock. But it does mimic the taste of demi-glace sauce I used to taste at a Japanese style restaurant in Korea.
  • One of the most important steps in making demi-glace sauce is making ‘roux’. The key point of making ‘roux’ is cooking the oil and the flour over medium to medium high heat and stirring it occasionally until it turns brown. The color of ‘roux’ determines the color of the demi-glace sauce. It also influences the depth of flavor. For instance, using longer cooked ‘roux’ will give you more depth as long as you don’t burn it.
  • It is also important to simmer the demi-glace sauce for about 8 to 10 mins to thicken and develop more flavor after adding the milk and water. Also, if you omit the milk, the sauce won’t thicken as much.

Omelette

  • While it is convenient to skip this step, be sure to sieve through the beaten egg. It will result in a smooth textured omelette. Also, when you make the tornado omelette, it will give you a more pleasant eating experience as we will serve the omelette that is not completely cooked (often served at 90-95% cooked status). 
  • Don’t forget to preheat the frying pan really well before pouring in the beaten egg. (Usually the second omelette works better than the first batch as the pan is well heated.) The tornado omelette will most likely fail if you don’t preheat well.
  • When making tornado omelette, use a smaller non-stick frying pan (e.g. 24 cm / 9.5 inch) rather than a larger frying pan. This is easier to work with and it will increase your chance of getting a successful tornado omelette.
  • When you make tornado omelette, the most critical thing to remember is timing. More specifically, the omelette turning time using your chopsticks. You should start gathering and twisting with the chopsticks when the outer edge of the egg omelette is cooked. Another good telltale is the omelette starting to form air bubbles in the middle of the pan. You should look for a bit larger sized bubbles. If you’re not sure, be sure to check my video above. If you start twisting the omelette too late, the omelette will tear and you won’t be able to shape tornado at all. If you start twisting it too early, the egg won’t gather at all.  Also remember that as with anything, the more you practice the better looking tornado omelette you will get. Only practice will help you make better looking tornado omelette.

How to Store

If you have leftover omurice, you can refrigerate it for 3 to 4 days in an air tight container. I would keep the fried rice separate to the demi-glace sauce (if you made it), so that the sauce doesn’t get absorbed by the rice during the storage period.

I would also make the egg omelette fresh on the day of eating the leftovers rather than making it in advance.

POPULAR KOREAN RICE RECIPES

Rice is a staple food in Korea and it’s only natural that there are many creative recipes that involve it. Try these popular Korean rice dishes. They are so delicious!

Omelette rice served on a white plate. Spoon cut a corner of the omurice.

Ingredients for Omurice (Omelette Rice), 2 to 3 servings

Demi-Glace Sauce (Short Cut, Meatless Version)

  • 1.5 Tbsp cooking oil
  • 1 Tbsp plain flour
  • 5 Tbsp ketchup
  • 1 Tbsp soy sauce, regular (kikkoman)
  • 1 Tbsp Tonkatsu sauce or regular soy sauce
  • 1 Tbsp honey or brown sugar
  • 3/4 cup water
  • 1/4 cup milk

Fried Rice

  • 1/2 carrot (60g / 2 ounces), finely chopped
  • 1/2 onion (80g / 2.8 ounces), finely chopped
  • 1/3 green bell pepper (45g / 1.6 ounces), finely chopped
  • 80g / 2.8 ounces smoked deli ham (e.g Strasburg meat), finely diced or minced beef, pork or chicken
  • 2 cups cooked rice (short or medium grain), cooled
  • Some cooking oil

Rice Seasoning

  • 1 Tbsp ketchup (or more if not serving with the demi-glace sauce above)
  • 1 Tbsp Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 Tbsp soy sauce, regular (kikkoman)
  • 1 Tbsp rice wine (mirin)

Omelette 

  • 6 to 9 eggs (3 eggs per serving)
  • A pinch of salt
  • Some cooking oil

* 1 Tbsp = 15 ml, 1 cup = 250 ml

How to Make Omurice (Omelette Rice)

Demi-Glace Sauce

1. Combine the sauce ingredients – ketchup, soy sauce, Tonkatsu sauce, honey, water and milk in a bowl or large measuring cup. Set aside.

Omurice sauce ingredients lined up on a wooden board

2. Preheat a frying pan and add the cooking oil and flour. Cook over medium to medium high heat until the liquid turns dark brown. It takes about 5 to 7 minutes. Stir occasionally. Reduce the heat to low.

Step by step collage picture for making roux for omurice sauce

3. Pour the sauce in from step 1 and stir well. Bring up the heat and cook over medium low to medium heat until the sauce thickens (about 8-10 minutes). Stir often. Set aside.

Step by step collage picture for making omurice sauce

Fried Rice

1. Preheat a skillet and add some cooking oil. Stir fry carrot, onion, green bell pepper and smoked ham until all ingredients are cooked.

Step by step collage picture for stir frying vegetables

2. Add the rice and the rice seasoning and mix them well for 1 to 2 minutes.

Cooking rice for omurice

3. Turn the heat off. Cover with foil or a lid to keep the rice warm while getting other ingredients ready.

Fried rice for omurice in a skillet

4. When ready to serve, shape the rice in a small bowl to make mounds of rice. Place the serving plate on the bowl and flip. Remove the bowl.

Serving fried rice on a white plate

How to Make Omurice Egg

Choose your omelette style and follow the relevant instructions from below!

Tornado Omelette

1. Beat the eggs in a bowl. To give a smooth texture, sieve through the eggs. (This is also one of the key points for success as it makes the omelette turn smoothly). Add a pinch of salt. 

Collage image of getting the omurice egg ready for cooking

2. Preheat a non-stick frying pan over medium high heat. (It should be heated well enough for the egg to bubble up when you pour it in.) Add some cooking oil and spread it all over the pan.

3. Pour the beaten egg onto the pan and cook it until the edge (about 3 mm / 0.12 inch) is cooked. But an easier telltale is when the omelette starts forming air bubbles in the middle of the pan. You should look for a bit larger sized bubbles. 

Pouring beaten egg

4. Hold one wooden chopstick in each hand diagonally to yourself and push the egg from the edge towards the centre while maintaining about 4 to 5 cm (1.5-2 inch) gap between each chopstick, and start twirling your chopsticks in one direction. Holding diagonal instead of parallel to yourself will give you more room to turn the egg.

Swap the chopstick holding hands in between twirling to be able to keep turning and to make the tornado egg smoothly. Cook the omelette until it’s about 95% cooked. (If the omelette is fully cooked, it’s hard to keep the tornado shape as it might break in the centre.)

Collage image of making tornado omelette

5. Hold the chopsticks with one hand and slowly slide the omelette from the pan onto the shaped rice.

Serving tornado omelette on top of rice

6. Pour the demi-glace sauce (or ketchup if you didn’t make the sauce) and serve. 

Tornado omurice (Korean omelette rice) served on a white plate

Oval Shape Omelette

1. Beat the eggs in a bowl. To give a smooth texture, sieve through the eggs. Add a pinch of salt.

2. Preheat a non-stick frying pan over medium high heat. Add some cooking oil.

3. Reduce the heat to medium and pour the beaten egg in the pan. Quickly spread the egg and make a thin, large, and round omelette.

Pan frying omelette

4. Once the omelette is 85% cooked, place one serving of fried rice in the middle of the omelette and spread well.

Fried rice on omelette

5. Fold around the edge of the omelette toward the rice, providing a short blanket.

Wrapping fried rice with omelette

6. Slowly slide and flip the egg from the pan onto the serving plate. Or place the serving plate on the omelette rice and flip the pan. Ensure there’s no residual oil in the pan to avoid an accidental burn.

White plate facing upside down

7. Use cooking foil (or cooking paper) to shape the omelette into an oval shape. Watch out as the omelette rice can be hot.

Oval shaped omurice on a white plate

8. Pour the demi-glace sauce (or ketchup if you didn’t make the sauce) and serve.

Football shaped omurice served on a white plate with brown sauce

Round Shape Omelette (Easiest)

1. Beat the eggs in a bowl. To give a smooth texture, sieve through the eggs. Add a pinch of salt.

2. Preheat a non-stick frying pan over medium high heat. Add some cooking oil.

3. Pour the beaten egg in the pan. Quickly spread the egg and make a thin, large, and round omelette.

4. Once the omelette is fully cooked, slide it out onto a small bowl. Gently tuck in the egg following the shape of the bowl.

Omelette tucked in a small bowl making a shell

5. Place the fried rice on top of the omelette (from step 4). Push it gently to shape it firm.

Omelette and fried rice tucked in a small bowl

6. Place the serving plate on top of the bowl. Flip the plate and remove the bowl.

Collage image - (left) a white plate facing upside down (right) omurice served on a white plate

7. Pour the demi-glace sauce (or ketchup if you didn’t make the sauce) and serve.

Omelette rice served on a white plate with drizzled ketchup

 

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Omurice on a white plate with brown sauce

Omurice (Omelette Rice)

Super delicious Korean style omurice (omelette rice) recipe. I will show you three different ways to serve your omelette rice / omelet rice!
4.8 from 5 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: Main
Cuisine: Korean Fusion
Keyword: korean omelette rice, omelet rice, omelette rice, omu rice, omurice, tornado omurice
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 35 minutes
Total Time: 45 minutes
Servings: 2 to 3
Calories: 702kcal
Author: Sue

Ingredients

DEMI-GLACE SAUCE (SHORT CUT, MEATLESS VERSION)

  • 1.5 Tbsp cooking oil (I used rice bran oil)
  • 1 Tbsp plain flour
  • 5 Tbsp ketchup
  • 1 Tbsp soy sauce , regular (kikkoman)
  • 1 Tbsp Tonkatsu sauce or regular soy sauce
  • 1 Tbsp honey or brown sugar
  • 3/4 cups water
  • 1/4 cups milk

FRIED RICE

  • Some cooking oil
  • 1/2 carrot  (60g / 2 ounces), finely chopped
  • 1/2 onion (80g / 2.8 ounces), finely chopped
  • 1/3 green bell peppers (45g / 1.6 ounces), finely chopped
  • 80 g smoked ham 2.8 ounces, (e.g Strasburg meat), finely diced or minced beef, pork or chicken
  • 2 cups cooked rice (short or medium grain), cooled

RICE SEASONING

  • 1 Tbsp ketchup (or more if not serving with the demi-glace sauce above)
  • 1 Tbsp Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 Tbsp soy sauce , regular (kikkoman)
  • 1 Tbsp rice wine (mirin)

OMELETTE 

  • Some cooking oil
  • 6 eggs (3 eggs per serving)
  • A pinch salt

Instructions

DEMI-GLACE SAUCE

  • Combine the sauce ingredients – ketchup, soy sauce, Tonkatsu sauce, honey, water and milk in a bowl or large measuring cup. Set aside.
  • Preheat a frying pan and add the cooking oil and flour. Cook over medium to medium high heat until the liquid turns dark brown. It takes about 5 to 7 minutes. Stir occasionally. Reduce the heat to low.
  • Pour the sauce in from step 1 and stir well. Bring up the heat and cook over medium low to medium heat until the sauce thickens (about 8-10 minutes). Stir often. Set aside.

FRIED RICE

  • Preheat a skillet and add some cooking oil. Stir fry carrot, onion, green bell pepper and smoked ham until all ingredients are cooked.
  • Add the rice and the rice seasoning and mix them well for 1 to 2 minutes.
  • Turn the heat off. Cover with foil or a lid to keep the rice warm while getting other ingredients ready.
  • When ready to serve, shape the rice in a small bowl to make mounds of rice. Place the serving plate on the bowl and flip. Remove the bowl.

TORNADO OMELETTE

  • Beat the eggs in a bowl. To give a smooth texture, sieve through the eggs. (This is also one of the key points for success as it makes the omelette turn smoothly). Add a pinch of salt. 
  • Preheat a non-stick frying pan over medium high heat. (It should be heated well enough for the egg to bubble up when you pour it in.) Add some cooking oil and spread it all over the pan.
  • Pour the beaten egg onto the pan and cook it until the edge (about 3 mm / 0.12 inch) is cooked. But an easier telltale is when the omelette starts forming air bubbles in the middle of the pan. You should look for a bit larger sized bubbles.
  • Hold one wooden chopstick in each hand diagonally to yourself and push the egg from the edge towards the centre while maintaining about 4 to 5 cm (1.5-2 inch) gap between each chopstick, and start twirling your chopsticks in one direction. Holding diagonal instead of parallel to yourself will give you more room to turn the egg.
    Swap the chopstick holding hands in between twirling to be able to keep turning and to make the tornado egg smoothly. Cook the omelette until it’s about 95% cooked. (If the omelette is fully cooked, it’s hard to keep the tornado shape as it might break in the centre.)
  • Hold the chopsticks with one hand and slowly slide the omelette from the pan onto the shaped rice.
  • Pour the demi-glace sauce (or ketchup if you didn’t make the sauce) and serve.

OVAL SHAPE OMELETTE

  • Beat the eggs in a bowl. To give a smooth texture, sieve through the eggs. Add a pinch of salt.
  • Preheat a non-stick frying pan over medium high heat. Add some cooking oil.
  • Reduce the heat to medium and pour the beaten egg in the pan. Quickly spread the egg and make a thin, large, and round omelette.
  • Once the omelette is 85% cooked, place one serving of fried rice in the middle of the omelette and spread well.
  • Fold around the edge of the omelette toward the rice, providing a short blanket.
  • Slowly slide and flip the egg from the pan onto the serving plate. Or place the serving plate on the omelette rice and flip the pan. Ensure there’s no residual oil in the pan to avoid an accidental burn.
  • Use cooking foil (or cooking paper) to shape the omelette into an oval shape. Watch out as the omelette rice can be hot.
  • Pour the demi-glace sauce (or ketchup if you didn’t make the sauce) and serve.

ROUND SHAPE OMELETTE (EASIEST)

  • Beat the eggs in a bowl. To give a smooth texture, sieve through the eggs. Add a pinch of salt.
  • Preheat a non-stick frying pan over medium high heat. Add some cooking oil.
  • Pour the beaten egg in the pan. Quickly spread the egg and make a thin, large, and round omelette.
  • Once the omelette is fully cooked, slide it out onto a small bowl. Gently tuck in the egg following the shape of the bowl.
  • Place the fried rice on top of the omelette (from step 4). Push it gently to shape it firm.
  • Place the serving plate on top of the bowl. Flip the plate and remove the bowl.
  • Pour the demi-glace sauce (or ketchup if you didn’t make the sauce) and serve.

Notes

Be sure to check out my best omurice cooking tips from the main post above. There are too many to list in this small space.

Nutrition Info (per serving)

Calories: 702kcal | Carbohydrates: 80g | Protein: 33g | Fat: 26g | Saturated Fat: 6g | Cholesterol: 513mg | Sodium: 2759mg | Potassium: 794mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 26g | Vitamin A: 3645IU | Vitamin C: 22mg | Calcium: 151mg | Iron: 5mg

The nutrition information shown is an estimate provided by an online nutrition calculator. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist’s advice.

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Written by: Sue

Last Updated: October 25, 2020
Sue and My Korean Kitchen Profile

Welcome to my Korean kitchen! I’m so happy that you're here. I am Sue, the creator behind My Korean Kitchen (since 2006). I love good food and simplifying recipes. Here you will find my best and family approved recipes. Thanks for stopping by!

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66 thoughts on “Omurice (Omelette Rice)”

  1. This recipe is a keeper. The only change I made was some chilli in the sauce – I just can’t cook without it. And my omelette wasn’t pretty. Thanks so much it was fab! I always keep the water that I cook gammon in in my freezer and cooked the rice in this, it added to the flavour

    Reply
  2. Thanks for the recipe, Sue, and the detailed instructions! I confess, I didn’t think I could manage the tornado omelette, so I went for the basic shape. Good thing I did, because even then I didn’t turn out nice-looking omelettes each time (did 6 servings). I think my family prefers more of a tomato flavour, so I’ll add more ketchup next time. The demi-glace sauce was perfect! I’d eat that with plain rice . .

    Thanks again!

    Reply
    • I’m so happy to hear you enjoyed my demi-glace sauce! While making tornado omelette is fun, the brown sauce is the highlight for me. 🙂 It’s just so delicious. I could eat it with plain rice as well.

      Also, to present omurice nicely, you might want to use a smaller bowl. Basically the omelette should be slightly bigger than the bowl. Also your technique will improve with more practice. I didn’t nail perfect shapes in my first go either. So don’t give up!

      Reply
  3. Sue, this dish looks amazing!! You put so much work into it and I
    can see why you did so many tests. (But then you get to eat them too!)
    Thanks for posting and sharing.

    Reply
  4. I’ve been wanting to eat this but I’m so glad that I got the email from you so I can make it myself!! I think I seen the Japanese version on a Netflix show called Street Food and I’ve been wanting to try it ever since!! What sauce would you recommend for a first timer or is it by preference? Thank you much for the recipes!!

    Reply
    • As far as taste goes demi-glace sauce version is much tastier than a store bought ketchup. Though, ketchup is good when you don’t have much time cooking omurice. 🙂 You should try both eventually.

      Reply
  5. hello eunie after i watch rooftop prince..i tried to cook that omurice in our home but not look like yours but it look like omurice hehehe because no kimchi here in the philippines..but i like your recipe so much eunie 🙂
    i love rooftop prince ever… i wanted to see them..

    Reply
  6. after watching the Korean dramas Playful Kiss & Rooftop Prince I madly wanted to taste the Omurice… thanks 4 the recipe, I’ll enjoy cooking & eating Omurice !

    Reply
  7. RoofTop Prince made me wanna do this recipe so badly ,, Cause it Looked so amazing in the Darama when Park yoochun was eating it
    Exactly as it Looks in the pics shown
    Thank you for the recipe <3

    Reply
    • I hope you enjoy the recipe, Loca! I’ve got to watch that TV show soon. Everyone visiting this page all seem to be influenced by that. 🙂

      Reply
  8. yeah, i made a search because i wonder how the rangers and the prince love this omurice…will try this one…i love rooftop prince …the best ever..thanks for posting.. and im glad, i have others who shared the same feeling as i am…

    Reply
  9. Ouh my no doubt after watching the Roof Top Prince, i kinda like the simple meal prepared by Park Ha. And here I am looking into the recipe, indeed its simple and straightforward. Thanks for sharing, at least now i know what i do if i have left over rice which normally gosh into the rubbish bin.

    Reply
  10. I was craving for omurice after watching Rooftop Prince =)
    Thats why Im here. Looking for its recipe….
    For Sandra, do not soaked the rice, use the steamed rice instead(the normal way on how to cooked the rice).
    Thanks for sharing the recipe =)

    Reply
  11. Hi
    Does anyone have thoughts on how long you need to soak your rice before cooking? My grandmother did it overnight and it tasted great but sometimes you just forget to do it the night before.

    Reply
  12. Great recipe. But I find it delicious with Green Paprika and extra garlic as well. Too bad, most restaurants in Korea pour massive amounts of flavour enhancers in virtually all dishes including omurice.

    Reply
  13. Sounds ghastly.
    This is not Korean food. It seems Korean-American – yes that pejorative is needed to justify this utterly horrible recipe.

    Reply
  14. Ah! This recipe is amazing! Thanks so much for posting it. I have always wanted to try this, but was scared because I didn’t know what was in it or how to make it. The tutorial and pictures are great! Looks like I know what I’m making for dinner tonight!! ~~~ヾ(^∇^)

    Reply
  15. Oh my gosh! I pack my lunch for my older sister (who is a big lazy bum that can’t make her own lunch ^^) and myself. I grew up eating omurice when I lived in Korea. I haven;t had once since I was eight! I going to make them mini-omurice tomorrow as a special becasue tomorrow is the end of my sister’s SAT testing!!

    Reply
  16. this is such a cute way to make an omurice
    ive also been drooling over omurice and the demiglace sauce since watching lunch queen too ~~~
    i really want to make it sometime

    Reply
  17. Your Omurice recipe is the best one I found on the net. Maybe because its the closest that resembles my mother’s recipe. Thank you! 🙂

    Reply
  18. Ingenious! Most of the time I am lazy and will only make thin omelets, then roll and cut them in strips to pile on top of fried rice, or worse, I just include scrambled egg in the fried rice. Omuraisu in it’s real form has eluded me! I will try your idea next time–great looking result for such a simple technique.

    Reply
  19. Hi Sue, I have tried it for dinner tonight. It was a success. It’s so easy to make, and yet it looked like a cuisine ^^. Thanks so much. I will be trying more of your Korean dishes.

    Reply
  20. I didn’t know this was an actual dish, I thought it was just something my Kinapa invented 🙂 I love to make this with some SPAM or chicken and some ranch dressing as a dip, weird, huh? And that’s a great idea to cut the cross on top and eat it that way, I’ll have to try this next time!

    Reply
  21. Thanks everyone for your kind words. I didn’t expect these sensational reactions to this omelet. 🙂 I really hope you and your families enjoy having your omelet as much as I did. Good luck to you all!

    Reply
  22. I’ve just drooled all over my keyboard. I just found this site and am really excited. Omurice is one of my favorite dishes from my childhood. My mom would never take the care in crafting the shape of the omelette like you’ve done so well, but it looks just like I remember tasting it. so so so good.

    Reply
  23. yeah, omurice. i’ve been craving for that since i’ve seen lunch queen as well. omurice with demiglace sauce. 😀
    this looks wonderful. thanks for sharing the recipe. 😀 gotta try this. 😀

    Reply
  24. Our almost 3yr old saw a photo of your masterpiece and said “YUM!”. He took the words right out of my mouth. I’ll be making it on the weekend.

    Reply
  25. That’s a neat idea to cover the rice with the egg. 🙂 I don’t like to spend time dicing vegetables too, so I usually buy them frozen. If I buy them fresh, sometimes I cannot finish what I bought anyway.

    Reply
  26. wow!!! that is a very innovative way of making omurice… I always think it’s very complicated to envelope the fried rice inside the omelette. I have been drooling over omurice ever since i watch the japanese drama “lunch queen”

    Bravo!!!

    Nice presentation too!!!

    Reply

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