Never miss a new recipe Subscribe

Korean Seafood Hot Pot (Haemul Jeongol)

Spicy Korean seafood hot pot! It’s loaded with prawns, mussels and vegetables. Delicious and very refreshing! 
Korean Seafood Hot Pot (Haemul Jeongol) | MyKoreanKitchen.com

This spicy seafood hot pot (haemul jeongol, 해물전골) is something you might like on a cold night.

The soup was so flavorful and moreish, you can not dislike it if you love Korean food!

When I had the first spoonful of the soup it gave me a feeling as if I solved some kind of a mystery, though the hit of the korean chili flakes on your throat is something you need to watch out for. 😉

I cooked this stew on a portable burner, something I very much enjoy doing lately when I cook.

I’m a firm believer in that food tastes best when it is kept hot during the meal! Enjoy the seafood hot pot!

P.S. If you like this recipe, you might also like these Korean hot pot recipes – Budae Jjigae (Army Stew) and Korean Dumpling Hot Pot

Ingredients for Korean Seafood Hot Pot (Serves 4)

Korean seafood hot pot ingredients

Main

  • 380g prawns, cleaned
  • 300g mussels, cleaned
  • 4 shiitake mushrooms, thinly sliced
  • 1/3 zucchini, thinly sliced
  • 150g daikon radish, thinly sliced
  • 60g crown daisy
  • 100g soybean sprouts
  • 5 cups water
  • 30g kombu (dried kelp)
  • 1 green chili, thinly sliced

Hot Pot Sauce (mix these in a bowl)

  • 3 Tbsp Korean chili flakes (gochugaru), can be reduced per your spice level preference
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp minced garlic
  • 2 Tbsp rice wine
  • 1 Tbsp soy sauce
  • 1/2 Tbsp fish sauce
  • 1 tsp brown sugar

How to Make Spicy Seafood Hot Pot

1. Boil the water (5 cups) and when it starts to boil add the mussels. When the mussels open their shells, sieve the water through a cloth strainer to get rid of the sand that comes out of the mussels. Keep this boiled water for later.

White Prawn and Mussle Stew (Saewoo Honghap Tang)prep

2. Add the boiled water (from step 1) into a clean pot, add the dried kelp, and boil it for 2-3 minutes. Take out the kelp and discard.

3. Add the radish and the hot pot sauce. Stir it well to dissolve.

White Prawn and Mussle Stew (Saewoo Honghap Tang)cooking

4. Add the remaining vegetables, prawns, and cooked mussels into the pot and when it starts to boil, you can start eating the cooked ingredients. Enjoy!

White Prawn and Mussle Stew (Saewoo Honghap Tang)2
Korean Seafood Hot Pot (Haemul Jeongol) | MyKoreanKitchen.com

Korean Seafood Hot Pot

How to make spicy korean seafood hot pot!
4.5 from 2 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: Soup
Cuisine: Korean
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 25 minutes
Servings: 4
Calories: 192kcal
Author: Sue | My Korean Kitchen

Ingredients

Main

  • 380 g prawns , cleaned
  • 300 g mussels , cleaned
  • 4 shiitake mushrooms , thinly sliced
  • 1/3 zucchini , thinly sliced
  • 150 g daikon , thinly sliced
  • 60 g crown daisy
  • 100 g soybean sprouts
  • 5 cups water
  • 20 g kombu (dried kelp)
  • 1 green chili , thinly sliced

Sauce (Mix these in a bowl)

Instructions

  • Boil the water (5 cups) and when it starts to boil add the mussels. When the mussels open their shells, sieve the water through a cloth strainer to get rid of the sand that comes out of the mussels. Keep this boiled water for later.
  • Add the boiled water (from step 1) into a clean pot, add the dried kelp, and boil it for 2-3 minutes. Take out the kelp and discard.
  • Add the radish and the hot pot sauce. Stir it well to dissolve.
  • Add the remaining vegetables, prawns, and cooked mussels into the pot and when it starts to boil, you can start eating the cooked ingredients. Enjoy!

Nutrition

Calories: 192kcal | Carbohydrates: 12g | Protein: 27g | Fat: 3g | Cholesterol: 250mg | Sodium: 1451mg | Potassium: 544mg | Fiber: 4g | Sugar: 4g | Vitamin A: 1875IU | Vitamin C: 23.7mg | Calcium: 207mg | Iron: 5.4mg
Tried this recipe?I love hearing how you went with my recipes! Leave a comment below or Tag me on Instagram @MyKoreanKitchen.

 

You May Also Like

Written by: Sue

Last Updated: May 13, 2019

Hi, I'm Sue and I am the creator of My Korean Kitchen. Thank you for joining me in this delicious culinary journey!

Leave a Comment

12 thoughts on “Korean Seafood Hot Pot (Haemul Jeongol)”

  1. Great recipe, you can also use the water from rinsing rice to make the stew a nice consistency. I love cooking at the table also, it is a great way to involve your family in the cooking and spend extra time together.

  2. Singapore is always hot. No winter cold even the rest of world is enjoying a winter wonderland, or an April Snow. But the soup looks so inviting and warming….I will try this next, on a portable boiler – like you said- to get that restaurant feeling.

  3. Hey Sue,
    Just want to let you know I made this soup today and my husband and I LOVED it! Your recipe was perfect. I paid tribute to you and this soup on my blog. Thank you so much!!!

  4. Evil Jonny,
    Man, you have everything planted in your backyard, don’t you?
    I am going to plant my own herbs and etc in couple of months time too.
    I will write the dish name in Korean characters from now on as well.

    Kat, It is very nice to warm your body with.

    Tigerfish,
    I think you know me very well. Generous servings of prawns and mussels are the best. 😀

  5. Great dish for a cool weather! Agree that such soup stew tastes best when kept hot throughout the meal. Great job! Better than restaurant, as you have generous servings of prawns and mussels ;D

  6. This looks so fantastic, especially with the cold weather. Thanks for sharing this recipe.

    It’s impossible to buy ssukgat here, so I’m currently trying to grow it in my backyard garden. Wish me luck! It’s about 2-3 inches tall now. Fingers crossed.

    By the way, would it be possible for you to share the Korean names of the dishes in Korean characters as well, for your dishes? I’m learning Korean now and I would like to recognize the dish in its original Korean characters, too. Just an idea. Maybe it will also drive more traffic to your great site.

  7. Actually, I usually clean the prawns before I cook them.
    I just wanted to take a picture of properly shaped & cooked prawns because that looks more appetizing. 🙂

    My husband never eats fish at a restaurant in Korea because of the bones. I always separate the bones from the fish and hand it out for him. I feel like I’m feeding my baby bird. 🙂

    I also don’t like eating fish eggs (not including caviar) nor head either.

  8. You don’t de-vein the prawns??

    Anyway,I always take the head and shell off and remove the intestinal tract.I guess Koreans don’t (individuals and restaurants)

    Actually,the way Westerners and Koreans prepare seafood,especially fish, is quite different. Westerners just eat the flesh and the fish is separated from the spine. Koreans eat the flesh,and don’t seem to mind spending a long time picking out the bones. 🙂

Leave a Comment

NEVER MISS A NEW RECIPE

Join 15,000+ other Korean food lovers! Get the latest recipes from

My Korean Kitchen delivered to your email inbox. It's free!