Seasoned Green Bean Sprouts (Sukju Namul Muchim)

Pin It
Seasoned Green Bean Sprouts (Sukju Namul Muchim in Korean)1

I am into these green bean sprouts lately. They give a flavourful taste to soup and a savory taste to side dishes. I don’t make many side dishes (I prefer one dish meals that don’t require any side dishes, because it is simple and quick, and I don’t need to wash many plates later on :)), but I thought I should try some side dish recipes to show you, since I haven’t made one for a while. So I tried making seasoned green bean sprouts and the more I eat them, the more I like them.

Their flavour comes out with a good balance of salt, garlic and sesame oil. They have a mild taste and chewing their fiber is another pleasure (They give a bit of a soft yet crunchy feeling).

Ingredients for 4 people

(Prep time – 2 minutes, Cooking time – 10 minutes)

  • Green bean sprouts 250 g
  • Salt – ½ tsp
  • Sesame oil – 1 tsp
  • Minced garlic – 1/8 tsp
  • Finely chopped green onion – 2 tsp
  • Parched sesame – 1/8 tsp

Steps

Seasoned Green Bean Sprouts (Sukju Namul Muchim in Korean) steps1
  1. Rinse the green bean sprouts in cold water, discard the bad beans.
  2. Boil some water in a pot. (I used 3 cups of water)
  3. Add the green bean sprouts when the water starts to boil.
  4. Par boil them for 2 minutes.
  5. Drain the water. Cool down the sprouts. (if you lift them with tongs or chopsticks frequently, it cools down faster.)
  6. Add the salt on top (sprinkle it all over the place) and leave it like that for 3 minutes.
  7. Squeeze the green bean sprouts with your hands. (discard the water if it comes out)
  8. Add the rest of the seasoning sauce, and mix them well.
  9. Serve them on a dish.
Seasoned Green Bean Sprouts (Sukju Namul Muchim in Korean) steps2

Side story about “Sukju Namul” (Green bean sprouts)

Seasoned Green Bean Sprouts (Sukju Namul Muchim in Korean)3

Writing about Korean food certainly makes me study. While I was translating sukju namul into English, which was about a month ago, I found that they are called green bean sprouts in English. Green bean sprouts? Are they made of green beans? I didn’t realize that they are made of green beans (apparently I was ignorant about Korean food and its history before I started this blog), because they disguised their name into sukju all this time. Green bean is Nokdu in Korean, then how come Koreans call green bean sprouts Sukju namul instead of Nokdu namul?

Well, apparently, there is a popular traditional theory and most Koreans seem to believe, that is the true. There was a scholar called Shin Suk-ju in 1462, and he betrayed his king when there was a coup (There was a young king called ‘Danjong’, and his uncle ‘Sejo’ tried to take over the throne.) When the coup happened he was asked to help his king, but he refused to do so. Apparently green bean sprouts go off very easily, so their easily changing characteristic is similar to Shin Suk-ju’s mind. That is why Green bean sprouts are named Sukju namul instead of Nokdu namul.

Apparently green bean sprouts are more nutritious than soybean sprouts and have 80 times more nutrients than green beans themselves.

You might also like

Seasoned Green Bean Sprouts (Sukju Namul Muchim)
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Side dishes
Cuisine: Korean
Serves: 4
Ingredients
  • Green bean sprouts 250 g
  • Salt – ½ tsp
  • Sesame oil – 1 tsp
  • Minced garlic – ⅛ tsp
  • Finely chopped green onion – 2 tsp
  • Parched sesame – ⅛ tsp
Instructions
  1. Rinse the green bean sprouts in cold water, discard the bad beans.
  2. Boil some water in a pot. (I used 3 cups of water)
  3. Add the green bean sprouts when the water starts to boil.
  4. Par boil them for 2 minutes.
  5. Drain the water. Cool down the sprouts. (if you lift them with tongs or chopsticks frequently, it cools down faster.)
  6. Add the salt on top (sprinkle it all over the place) and leave it like that for 3 minutes.
  7. Squeeze the green bean sprouts with your hands. (discard the water if it comes out)
  8. Add the rest of the seasoning sauce, and mix them well.
  9. Serve them on a dish.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

About Sue

Hi, I'm Sue and I am the author/cook/photographer behind My Korean Kitchen. Thank you for joining me in this delicious culinary journey!

Comments

  1. I think it is called soy bean sprout. thank you for this recipe! i will try it today.

  2. I am soooo happy to find this web site! I have asked many friends for this recipe, but no one was able to give me quanity or time. This is my favorite side dish.

  3. Oba'san says:

    I am going to make these this afternoon to go with cold noodles – it is *very hot* here (105F today, will be in the 100′s all week) and we’re trying to find things to eat in this blistering heat !
    Hello from Texas…

    Oba’san

  4. Actually, they are Mung Bean Sprouts not Green Bean Sprouts. We love them at our house and use them frequently!

  5. I sent some time in Korean and after a night of drinking, I would stop by this vender along the street frying up something in a large frying pan. It tasted like hambuger in dough and it was non shpae. they would fry up about a half dozen of these at a time. Can you help me identy this food and get me the reciep. Thanks

  6. Gil, namul is edible wild vegetables and banchan is general side dishes.

  7. What is the difference between Namul and Ban Chan?

  8. I really hope it works out well for you.
    Then you and I both get a point. :)

  9. When I first moved to the U.S. with my husband, I could only get this kind of sprout (no 공나물) but I had no idea how to cook them (I was even bad at cooking 공나물 at that time) and when I tried a few times, my husband asked me not to make them anymore (that’s how bad they were). ã…‹ã…‹ã…‹ I’m going to put your recipe to the test, make them again and see what he says. I bet he’s going to like them! Thanks for the recipe. I have to drive a 1/2 an hour to get soybean sprouts but this kind are readily available.

  10. Kat, You must like it too. They are quite nice. I didn’t expect I would like it.

    Ellie, Do raw bean sprouts taste good? They seem a bit bitter for me. I haven’t made bibimbap with this, but I am sure that it goes well with it. Totally!!

    Jennifer, I think it will need more than soy sauce and chili flakes. I don’t have a recipe yet, but just give me some time, it will be on this blog soon, good suggestion though.

    Simcooks, I like its crunchy taste too. It goes well with a lot of ingredients, very practical veggie indeed. :)

    Pepy, that sounds interesting. I might try it.

  11. It’s looked like my cooking style, stir fry bean sprouts and tofu. Just add sliced green onion and a bit sweet soy sauce

  12. I like the crunchy texture of these green bean sprouts. When I buy roasted duck from the deli and have leftover duck, I’ll cut the duck into smaller pieces and stir fry them with these bean sprouts and create a new dish! I also like these bean sprouts stir fried with green onions!

  13. You must have read my mind! I was just thinking of these bean sprouts, thanks for the recipe I’m going to make them soon.

    I live in NYC so I’m very lucky to have access to korean supermarkets and restaurants. I love korean food! I have a question, how are seasoned sesame leaves made? I had some at my friend’s mom’s home over Christmas and simply loved them, so lightly fragrant and tasty. I saw that she marinated them in soy sauce and chili flakes but does it need anything else?

    I’m so glad I found your blog!

  14. This looks exactly like my ma’s cooking :) I love bean shoots (I always grab handfuls and eat them raw when she is making this), and I particularly love the muchim for bibimbap! Yummy!

  15. I learn a lot of Japanese foods too while blogging, Sue. This namul looks like the kind that they sell at the Korean take-out place in Hawaii. I always order it. :)

Trackbacks

  1. […] Seasoned Green Bean Sprouts (Sukju Namul Muchim in Korean) […]

  2. […] to the spinach side dish I posted recently. I also originally posted another Sukju Namul recipe here a very long time ago, but I decided to revisit it in a new post with a very minor adjustment in the […]

  3. [...] to Korean radio. They have everything prepared to-go for a tasty Korean meal. I only bought the bean sprouts salad that I love, but hope to try more. Posted by mightykushners Filed in Uncategorized Leave a [...]

Speak Your Mind

*

Rate this recipe:  
Powered by sweetCaptcha