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Spicy Korean Chicken Stew (Dak Dori Tang)

Super addictive and comforting, spicy Korean chicken stew recipe – Dak dori tang!

Chunky chicken and potatoes are braised in spicy Korean sauce. The result is amazing! It’s so delicious and heart warming! It’s a perfect main dish to serve with steamed rice.

Korean Spicy Chicken Stew (Dakdoritang)

Oh my my… It’s spring here. Living in a sub-tropical area means that I have pretty good weather all year around but every now and then we do get gusty windy weather. And, this spicy chicken stew is just perfect for those days.

It’s spicy but at the same time, it warms you up and gives you comfort. If you like having stew on a cold wintry day, I will say add this menu on your repertoire!

Korean Chicken Stew: Dakdoritang vs. Dakbokkemtang vs. Dakmaeunjjim

This spicy Korean chicken stew has many name tags under its belt – dakdoritang (닭도리탕), dakbokkeumtang (닭볶음탕) and dakmaeunjjim (닭매운찜).

But, they all point to the same thing. Spicy chicken stew!

Spicy Korean Chicken Stew

This all happened since the Korean government (more specifically the National Institute of the Korean Language, 국립 국어원) has been trying to encourage the use of “real Korean words” as opposed to loan words. But the thing is old habits die hard and many people still call and search for dakdoritang / dak dori tang recipe!

And interestingly there’s another theory recently developed that dakdoritang might be actually a pure Korean word (reference 1), so let’s leave the language battle there for now and let’s talk about the food more! 😉

Now, back to my spicy chicken stew recipe.

I originally posted the recipe in October 2006 and it was due for a new photo update. And, while I was doing so, I decided to moderate my original recipe as well, all for the best!

My new sauce is adapted from my slow cooker spicy braised chicken recipe and the new cooking technique is adapted from my soy sauce braised chicken (jjimdak) recipe. They both are very delicious chicken recipes, so don’t forget to check them out too!

Anyway, my spicy chicken stew recipe is really delicious. It’s quite addictive and moreish. Even my little girl loved it despite the spiciness. I Hope you enjoy my recipe too!

Ingredients for Spicy Chicken Stew (Serves 4)

Chicken and Vegetables

  • 1kg / 2.2 pounds chicken (I used a mix of chicken drumsticks and thigh fillets), cut into medium sized chunks
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 potatoes (450g / 1 pound), cut into medium pieces
  • 1 carrot (150g / 5.3 ounces), cut into medium pieces
  • 1 onion (190g / 6.7 ounces), cut into medium pieces
  • 3 perilla leaves, thinly sliced
  • 1 stalk of green onion (20g / 0.7 ounces), thinly sliced
  • 1 tsp roasted sesame seeds

Sauce (Mix these in a bowl)

  • 3 Tbsp gochujang (Korean chili paste)
  • 2 Tbsp gochugaru (Korean chili flakes)
  • 2 Tbsp rice wine
  • 2 Tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 Tbsp sugar, I used raw sugar
  • 1 Tbsp minced garlic
  • 1 tsp minced ginger
  • 1 tsp sesame oil
  • A few sprinkles ground black pepper

* 1 Tbsp = 15 ml, 1 Cup = 250 ml

** If you want to learn more about Korean ingredients, check my 30 essential Korean cooking ingredients list!

How to Make Spicy Korean Chicken Stew

1. On medium-high heat, boil some water (5 to 6 cups) in a medium sized pot. Once it’s rolling boiling, parboil the chicken for 1 minute. Drain the water.

Parboiling chicken

2. In a clean pot (I used this braising pot), add the chicken, sauce and the water. Boil them over medium-high heat for about 10 mins, covered.

Boiling chicken and sauce in a pot

3. Add the potatoes, carrots, and onions and boil for a further 7 mins, covered. Reduce the heat to medium and stir gently to change the position of the chicken and the vegetables. Add the perilla leaves. Simmer for a further 8 mins (or until the chicken and the potatoes are fully cooked), covered.

Boiling chicken and vegetables

4. Garnish with the green onion and sesame seeds. Serve hot with a bowl of steamed rice.

Korean Chicken and Potato Stew


Korean Spicy Chicken Stew (Dakdoritang)

Spicy Korean Chicken Stew

Easy Korean spicy chicken stew recipe.
4.67 from 9 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: Main
Cuisine: Korean
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 35 minutes
Total Time: 45 minutes
Servings: 4
Calories: 405kcal
Author: Sue | My Korean Kitchen

Ingredients

CHICKEN AND VEGETABLES

  • 1 kg chicken (2.2 pounds), I used a mix of chicken drumsticks and thigh fillets), cut into medium sized chunks
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 potatoes (450g / 1 pound), cut into medium pieces
  • 1 carrot (150g / 5.3 ounces), cut into medium pieces
  • 1 onion (190g / 6.7 ounces), cut into medium pieces
  • 3 perilla leaves , thinly sliced
  • 1 stalk green onion (20g / 0.7 ounces), thinly sliced
  • 1 tsp toasted sesame seeds

SAUCE (MIX THESE IN A BOWL)

Instructions

  • On medium-high heat, boil some water (5 to 6 cups) in a medium sized pot. Once it’s rolling boiling, parboil the chicken for 1 minute. Drain the water.
  • In a clean pot, add the chicken, sauce and the water. Boil them over medium-high heat for about 10 mins, covered.
  • Add the potatoes, carrots, and onions and boil for a further 7 mins, covered. Reduce the heat to medium and stir gently to change the position of the chicken and the vegetables. Add the perilla leaves. Simmer for a further 8 mins (or until the chicken and the potatoes are fully cooked), covered.
  • Garnish with the green onion and sesame seeds. Serve hot with a bowl of steamed rice.

Nutrition

Calories: 405kcal | Carbohydrates: 27g | Protein: 27g | Fat: 20g | Saturated Fat: 5g | Cholesterol: 90mg | Sodium: 681mg | Potassium: 899mg | Fiber: 5g | Sugar: 6g | Vitamin A: 79.1% | Vitamin C: 24.5% | Calcium: 8.1% | Iron: 31.8%
Tried this recipe?I love hearing how you went with my recipes! Leave a comment below or Tag me on Instagram @MyKoreanKitchen.

 

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Written by: Sue

Last Updated: May 13, 2019

Hi, I'm Sue and I am the creator of My Korean Kitchen. Thank you for joining me in this delicious culinary journey!

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39 thoughts on “Spicy Korean Chicken Stew (Dak Dori Tang)”

  1. Are the perilla leaves essential? Not sure I could find in my grocery store. I have perilla oil. Would that be a reasonable substitute?

  2. Hello, the recipe looks yummy. Will definitely try it out soon. (Love your budae jjigae recipe so much that I have been making it regularly!)

    Btw, can the leftover chicken stew be kept in the fridge/ freezer? There’s only me and my husband at home so even with 0.5 kg of chicken, coupled with the vegetables, the dish seems quite a lot for us to finish.

  3. Hi! Thank you so much for the recipe! I am 1/4 Korean (and have always been very proud of it) however there’s so little that I know about Korean food. I grew up with homemade Korean food cooked by my grandmother (she fled North Korea when she was 6 years old) but I never took advantage of learning how to make it for myself. Now she has cancer and I do not want to ask her because she is always tired and in pain. I regret not learning with her when I was younger. I’m definitely going to follow you on Pinterest so I can keep learning! I am so excited to learn more!! (My goal is to surprise her by bringing over some really good Korean food 🙂 )

  4. For those of you wondering, I made this in my Instant Pot last night and it turned out wonderfully. Same ingredients as above but I added some mushrooms and half a cabbage sliced (needed more veggies). I akso cut the carrots into big 1 inch chunks to prevent them from collapsing. Put everything in the pot with about 3/4 cup of water. Mix to combine everything in the sauce and cook on high for 25 minutes. Could probably try 20 minutes next time for firmer meat and veggies, but it was delicious. Thanks for the recipe!

  5. Sue
    I just have to tell you how great this stew is. Usually when I try a new recipe my husband likes it “just okay”. (he is a fabulous cook & makes most of our meals) Not only did he love it, he went back for a second helping! I can’t wait to try another one of your recipes. Thanks so much

  6. This looks so delicious Sue! I’m a vegetarian, but I’m always looking for easy meals I can make my meat-loving boyfriend, and I think he would definitely adore this stew! Sounds perfect for those chilly fall days. And now I can use up the gochujaru that’s been sitting at the back of my fridge forever, yay!

    Any way I could make this in a slow cooker or Instapot?

  7. Hi, I am a Korean,

    Actually, 닭도리탕 is not the correct word in Korean. It is a kind of Japanese word. so I recommend you to change the word to 닭볶음탕,

    Thank you
    Kindly regards
    Jooho HA

  8. I love this stew but can’t eat spicy so i can make it without the spicy chilies? Also do you have recipe for pancake. When I go to CA my daughter takes me to this Korean tofu restaurant and we order the pancake. Also the tofu soup without spicy.

    • Hi Tess, I don’t know about your spice tolerance level, so maybe this recipe is better for you to be safe. 🙂 https://mykoreankitchen.com/jjimdak/ It’s a very similar dish to dakdoritang, but it uses soy sauce based non-spicy sauce.

      But, if you insist on making this recipe (dakdoritang), then I would reduce the chili flakes to start off with. But this could be still spicy for you.

      As for the pancake recipe, there are many varieties of Korean pancakes, so you browse your options from here. https://mykoreankitchen.com/tag/pancakes/

      Enjoy!

  9. Hi Sue !

    Delicious looking dish that I’m anxious to try.

    Thank you very much for listing Metric and American measurements.
    Sure makes our lives easier 🙂

  10. Looks fantastic, and really want to make this dish. but perilla leaves are not available here even in our local Asian market. Is there a decent substitute, or can I just omit the leaves.

    • Hi Deb, I think it’s possible to cook this dish in an instant pot, but since I haven’t experimented it myself, I do not know what to modify. (I don’t own an instant pot.) You will have to try it yourself. Let us know how you go! 🙂

  11. In your initial instructions, #2 is ” In a clean pot (I used this braising pot), add the chicken, sauce and the water. Boil them over medium-high heat for about 10 mins, covered.”
    BUT on the recipe card, you say #2 “In a clean pot, add the chicken and the sauce. Boil them over medium-high heat for about 10 mins, covered.” NOTHING ABOUT “THE WATER,” WHICH YOU HAD US DRAIN IN STEP #1. WHICH IS CORRECT? PLEASE CLEAR UP THE QUESTION OF WATER, HOW MUCH, WHAT TO DO WITH IT, ETC.

    • Hi Richard, the recipe card is now updated correctly. (It must have been my transposition error.) Thanks for pointing that out.

      Water to be used in the step 2 is 1 cup, as it is listed in the ingredient section. (There’s no change here.) I didn’t list the water amount used in the step 1 in the ingredient section (though it is listed in the instruction as a rough guideline.) Since this water is to be discarded.

      Hope this clears up your question.

    • Richard:
      #1 calls for 5-6 cups of water to blanch the chicken pieces, this amount of water is mentioned incidentally in the cooking instructions and is not in the list of ingredients.
      #2 combines the water, sauce and chicken in a clean pot. I believe this is the 1 cup of water in the list of ingredients.
      I don’t believe the drained water in #1 is the water stated in #2. I see where this can be confusing as the first time I read it, it jumped out to me that I didn’t see 5-6 cups of water in the list of ingredients.
      This my read on the recipe and I hope this may be of some help. By the way, the chicken came out great.
      Bob Barna

  12. This looks delicious, I will try it this weekend. I love perilla leaves, but often do not know how to use them. I have another favorite recipe that is similar idea but you brown the chicken on high heat first, then cook veggies, then add all together and simmer. My stove is unfortunate, a flat glass top and takes a long time to heat the ingredients up when I make large stew pot, it takes a very long time to reach boil unless using a small pot. Therefore, the browning helps reduce overall recipe time.
    Have you ever tried the browning of the chicken instead of boiling/ do you think this would work here? thank you so much, I enjoy your receiving and making your authentic recipes.

    • Hi Noelani, I often brown chicken (usually the thigh fillets) before I cook them in my oven. I do this to give a nicely seared color and also to give a slightly crispier texture.

      In this recipe, the main purpose of parboiling the chicken (only for 1 min here) is to make clear/cleaner broth (by drawing out any excess fat, for example), but not necessarily to cook the chicken faster.

      Not all Koreans would blanch the chicken like this when making this dish. It’s just my personal preference. Hope this helps! 🙂

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