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Korean Pickled Perilla Leaves (Kkaennip Jangajji)

One of my favourite Korean banchan – pickled perilla leaves recipe! It’s so delicious and addictive! You will be hooked instantly!

Korean Pickled Perilla Leaves (Kkaennip Jangajji) | MyKoreanKitchen.com

Today I would like to share one of the classic Korean side dishes (banchan, 반찬), which is also one of my favourite side dishes. It’s Pickled Perilla Leaves (Kkaennip Jangajji, 깻잎 장아찌), also known as Perilla Kimchi (Kkaennip Kimchi, 깻잎 김치). These terms are used interchangebly on some occasions.

Kkaennip Jangajji (깻잎 장아찌) has a salty, slightly sweet and garlicky taste and is mainly seasoned with soy sauce.  Kkaennip Kimchi (깻잎 김치), on the other hand, has a spicy and garlicky taste like Cabbage Kimchi and is mainly seasoned with Korean chili flakes (Gochugaru, 고추가루).

I personally prefer the former version (Jangajji) of pickle but I also shared the Perilla Kimchi recipe in my banchan cookbook, for those of you like to pickle perilla that way.

Pickled perilla leaves side dish is one of the easiest Korean side dishes you can make. Using my recipe, you can prepare it within 10 mins. Though, you will have to wait at least overnight for it to properly get seasoned. I recommend you to eat this with some rice as on its own it will be too salty.

Pickled Perilla Leaves in Soy Sauce (Kkaennip Jangajji) comparison | MyKoreanKitchen.com

Most Koreans nickname this dish as a ‘rice stealer’ (Bap-Doduk, 밥-도둑), meaning you can consume rice easily and fast without you even knowing! I can totally relate to that!

A bowl of rice just accompanied by this delicious, aromatic and addictive side dish. Yum! My mouth is watering again. 🙂 I hope you get to experience this and like it too!

Ingredients for 5 to 7 serves (as a side dish)

Main

Seasoning sauce (mix these in a medium-sized bowl)

  • 10 Tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 tsp Korean chili flakes
  • 1 tsp minced garlic
  • 2 Tbsp brown sugar
  • 2 Tbsp spring onion, finely chopped
  • (Optional) 2 Tbsp green chilies or red chilies, finely chopped

*1 Tbsp = 15 ml

How to Make Pickled Perilla Leaves

1. Rinse the perilla leaves in cold running water and drain/air dry them while left in the colander.

Step 1. Washing & drying perilla leaves

2. While waiting for the perilla leaves to dry, prepare the seasoning sauce.

Step 2. Making seasoning sauce

3. Place the perilla leaves in stacks in a large (glass) container (with a lid). Spread (about 1 Tbsp worth of) seasoning sauce on top of the perilla leaf. Repeat this process for every 3 leaves for the rest of leaves.

As it is already stacked, you will have to lift the leaves at every third interval with one hand while the other hand is spreading the sauce. You don’t need to spread the sauce on every leaf.

If you have any sauce leftover, pour it onto the stacked leaves. If you run out of sauce, tip the container and scoop out the sauce from the bottom corner of the container and spread it over the perilla leaves.

Step 3. Spreading sauce over perilla leaves

4. Close the lid and move the container to the fridge. You can start eating this from the next day. Serve it with a hot bowl of rice.

(It can be stored in the fridge for at least one week. Though traditionally this dish was made during the summer months when many perilla leaves are available and consumed through the summer to winter.)

Korean Pickled Perilla Leaves (Kkaennip Jangajji)How to Eat:-

Pick up a piece of perilla leaf by the stem using your chopsticks, place it on top of your rice and wrap the rice with the perilla leaf.

Pickled Perilla Leaves in Soy Sauce (Kkaennip Jangajji) with rice


Korean Pickled Perilla Leaves (Kkaennip Jangajji)

Delicious Korean pickled perilla leaves in soy sauce brine
5 from 3 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: Side dishes
Cuisine: Korean
Keyword: perilla leaves
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 10 minutes
Servings: 5 to 7
Calories: 32kcal
Author: Sue | My Korean Kitchen

Ingredients

  • 32 leaves perilla (98 g / 3.5 ounces)

SEASONING SAUCE (MIX THESE IN A MEDIUM-SIZED BOWL)

  • 10 Tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 tsp Korean chili flakes (gochugaru)
  • 1 tsp minced garlic
  • 2 Tbsp brown sugar
  • 2 Tbsp spring onion , finely chopped
  • 2 Tbsp green chilies or red chilies, finely chopped

Instructions

  • Rinse the perilla leaves in cold running water and drain/air dry them while left in the colander.
  • While waiting for the perilla leaves to dry, prepare the seasoning sauce.
  • Place the perilla leaves in stacks in a large (glass) container (with a lid). Spread (about 1 Tbsp worth of) seasoning sauce on top of the perilla leaf. Repeat this process for every 3 leaves for the rest of leaves. As it is already stacked, you will have to lift the leaves at every third interval with one hand while the other hand is spreading the sauce. You don’t need to spread the sauce on every leaf. If you have any sauce leftover, pour it onto the stacked leaves. If you run out of sauce, tip the container and scoop out the sauce from the bottom corner of the container and spread it over the perilla leaves.
  • Close the lid and move the container to the fridge. You can start eating this from the next day. Serve it with a hot bowl of rice. (It can be stored in the fridge for at least one week. Though traditionally this dish was made during the summer months when many perilla leaves are available and consumed through the summer to winter.)

Nutrition

Calories: 32kcal | Carbohydrates: 5g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 1g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 1457mg | Potassium: 60mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 4g | Vitamin A: 102IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 8mg | Iron: 1mg
Tried this recipe?I love hearing how you went with my recipes! Leave a comment below or Tag me on Instagram @MyKoreanKitchen.

 

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Written by: Sue

Last Updated: August 12, 2019

Hi, I'm Sue and I am the creator of My Korean Kitchen. Thank you for joining me in this delicious culinary journey!

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16 thoughts on “Korean Pickled Perilla Leaves (Kkaennip Jangajji)”

  1. I’m so excited to try this! I assembled everything tonight and will check them out tomorrow. I was unsure about one thing in the instructions: are we supposed to let the leaves dry completely after draining, or is it enough to just drain most of the water from the leaves after washing? My father said the marinade smelled delicious! I thought about adding a bit of fresh ginger, but I decided to follo the recipe exactly first before making any alterations.

    Reply
  2. Thanks for the recipe, Sue. My husband loves perilla and grows it in the garden, and wants to be able to eat the perilla leaf pickle through the winter – does this freeze? Or is there some other way to keep perilla, since you mention it being eaten through summer and winter?

    Reply
    • Hi Anne, I haven’t tried freezing the perilla pickles, but this is how some Koreans do. Divide the pickles into one meal serving size portion (in several batches) and pack them in zipper lock bags. Defrost before you serve them. Hope this works out!

      Reply
  3. Manatee – I wonder if the purple leaves are actually beefsteak plant leaves.
    They are popular in Japan and are either green or purple but smaller than perilla leaves.
    They also have a very different flavour.

    Reply
  4. How did you know I’ve been craving these?? I wanted to get some at our tiny little Korean market but they only had the canned ones and I’ve never had those so I’m a bit apprehensive…once I go to the city I will see if they have fresh ones, thanks for the recipe!!

    Gina

    Reply
  5. Oh my! The pictures look so delicious I almost put my head through my computer screen to get to them!

    I have never eaten perilla leaves, but have fallen in love so with Korean food in the last few months that I am growing them in my garden. I can’t wait to try your recipes with them. Thanks so much!

    Reply
    • Perilla leaves grow so well in the garden. Lucky you! They’re by far my fav vegetables. 🙂
      Though, when I was growing them in my garden, there were many holes on the leaves as other insects love them too much. :/ But enjoy my recipe! I hope you like it.

      Reply
      • I have seen these leaves, packaged fresh, at my local Asian/Korean grocery store (that I mentioned in another comment on your blog). Can they be eaten fresh in addition to making this side dish? Also, do these leaves have other names (such as sesame leaf?) or is that another type of green? I am so lucky to have this market near me however it really does not help if a person does not know what everything is or what to do with certain products 🙂 Fortunately I have your blog for help. Thank you so much! andra

        Reply

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